Changes

Jump to navigation Jump to search
no edit summary
Line 13: Line 13:     
===Other articles in this section===
 
===Other articles in this section===
{{col-float|width=25em}}
+
{{col-float|width=20em}}
*[[Dhul-Qarnayn and the Sun Setting in a Muddy Spring - Part Two]]{{col-float-break|width=25em}}
+
*[[Dhul-Qarnayn and the Sun Setting in a Muddy Spring - Part Two]]{{col-float-break|width=20em}}
*[[Dhul-Qarnayn and the Sun Setting in a Muddy Spring - Part One]]{{Col-float-break|width=25em}}
+
*[[Dhul-Qarnayn and the Sun Setting in a Muddy Spring - Part One]]{{Col-float-break|width=20em}}
 
*[[Quran and a Universe from Smoke]]{{col-float-end}}
 
*[[Quran and a Universe from Smoke]]{{col-float-end}}
 
==Islamic medicinal practices and rituals==
 
==Islamic medicinal practices and rituals==
 
{{PortalArticle|title=Islamic Medicinal Practices|summary=|image=Blistering.jpeg|description=Islamic scriptures instruct a variety of medicinal practices that have consequently been practiced through centuries, including consuming cumin, drinking camel urine, consuming honey, using indian incense, dipping houseflies in drinks, cupping, and more.}}{{PortalArticle|image=|title=Islamic Fasting and Health|description=Islamic fasting (''sawm'') entails fasting from sunrise till sunset without any water or food. In the month of Ramadan, Muslims are obligated to fast the entire month. Empirical research has found the consequences of Islamic fasting (as it is practiced) on practitioners' health, society, and economy to be largely (but not entirely) adverse.|summary=}}{{PortalArticle|image=Burqa9.jpg|title=Islamic Attire and Health|summary=|description=It is generally agreed Muslim women are obligated by Islam to cover all parts of their body excluding their faces, hands, and sometimes feet. Empirical research has found that this practice has largely adverse effects on its practitioners' health and society. Adverse health effects primarily include Vitamin D deficiency as well as the enabling of obesity.}}{{PortalArticle|image=Ali x fatimah.jpg|title=Cousin Marriage in Islamic Law|summary=|description=First cousin marriages, permissible in and even encouraged by Islamic law, are extremely common in Muslim-majority countries. Muhammad married his first cousin (also the ex-wife of his adopted son) Zaynab. Today, consanguine (blood related) marriages comprise the majority in Upper Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, the UAE, and other Muslim populations.}}{{PortalArticle|image=|summary=|title=Camel Urine and Islam|description=Several authentic (''sahih'') hadith and early Islamic sources contain reports of Muhammad advancing camel urine as a cure for illnesses. Many modern Islamic scholars stand by this practice until today.}}{{PortalArticle|title=Diseases and Cures in the Wings of Houseflies|image=Phage.jpg|description=A hadith in [[Sahih Bukhari|Bukhari]] reports that Muhammad said, "If a house fly falls in the drink of anyone of you, he should dip it (in the drink), for one of its wings has a disease and the other has the cure for the disease." The practice described in this report is interpreted literally and is still encouraged by Islamic scholars.|summary=}}
 
{{PortalArticle|title=Islamic Medicinal Practices|summary=|image=Blistering.jpeg|description=Islamic scriptures instruct a variety of medicinal practices that have consequently been practiced through centuries, including consuming cumin, drinking camel urine, consuming honey, using indian incense, dipping houseflies in drinks, cupping, and more.}}{{PortalArticle|image=|title=Islamic Fasting and Health|description=Islamic fasting (''sawm'') entails fasting from sunrise till sunset without any water or food. In the month of Ramadan, Muslims are obligated to fast the entire month. Empirical research has found the consequences of Islamic fasting (as it is practiced) on practitioners' health, society, and economy to be largely (but not entirely) adverse.|summary=}}{{PortalArticle|image=Burqa9.jpg|title=Islamic Attire and Health|summary=|description=It is generally agreed Muslim women are obligated by Islam to cover all parts of their body excluding their faces, hands, and sometimes feet. Empirical research has found that this practice has largely adverse effects on its practitioners' health and society. Adverse health effects primarily include Vitamin D deficiency as well as the enabling of obesity.}}{{PortalArticle|image=Ali x fatimah.jpg|title=Cousin Marriage in Islamic Law|summary=|description=First cousin marriages, permissible in and even encouraged by Islamic law, are extremely common in Muslim-majority countries. Muhammad married his first cousin (also the ex-wife of his adopted son) Zaynab. Today, consanguine (blood related) marriages comprise the majority in Upper Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, the UAE, and other Muslim populations.}}{{PortalArticle|image=|summary=|title=Camel Urine and Islam|description=Several authentic (''sahih'') hadith and early Islamic sources contain reports of Muhammad advancing camel urine as a cure for illnesses. Many modern Islamic scholars stand by this practice until today.}}{{PortalArticle|title=Diseases and Cures in the Wings of Houseflies|image=Phage.jpg|description=A hadith in [[Sahih Bukhari|Bukhari]] reports that Muhammad said, "If a house fly falls in the drink of anyone of you, he should dip it (in the drink), for one of its wings has a disease and the other has the cure for the disease." The practice described in this report is interpreted literally and is still encouraged by Islamic scholars.|summary=}}
Editors, recentchangescleanup, Reviewers
6,600

edits

Navigation menu