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Among the many and diverse matters discussed in or touched upon by Islamic scriptures are topics of direct or indirect scientific interest. These topics include reproductive science, embryology, cosmology, medicine, and a slew of other topics.
 
Among the many and diverse matters discussed in or touched upon by Islamic scriptures are topics of direct or indirect scientific interest. These topics include reproductive science, embryology, cosmology, medicine, and a slew of other topics.
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== Overview ==
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==Overview==
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{{PortalArticle|image=Quran and Science.png|title=Islam and Science|summary=|description=Among the many and diverse matters discussed in or touched upon by Islamic scriptures are topics of direct or indirect scientific interest. These topics include reproductive science, embryology, cosmology, medicine, and a slew of other topics. While mainstream academic scholars and scientists have found the discussion of these topics contained in Islamic scripture to be unremarkable in its seventh-century context, in recent times, many traditional Muslim scholars and figures have argued that Islamic scriptures contains statements which not only adhere to but also predict modern science. Criticism of these ideas has been widespread and has even come from Muslim scholars themselves.}}
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== Biology ==
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==Prominent figures and movements==
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{{PortalArticle|image=Zakir Naik.png|title=Zakir Naik|description=A medical doctor by training, Naik is famous for theorizing and employing correlations between Islamic scripture and modern science for the purpose of ''dawah'', or proselytism.|summary=}}
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{{PortalArticle|image=Dr. keith moore.jpg|title=Dr. Keith Moore|description=In the 1980s he accepted an invitation by the Embryology Committee of King Abdulaziz University to produce a special 3rd edition of his most successful book ''The Developing Human'' specifically for use by Muslim students in Islamic Universities. The additions to the text for this new edition were those of co-author Abdul Majeed al-Zindani. Moore's name is frequently cited by modern Islamic scholars.|summary=}}
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{{PortalArticle|image=Maurice Bucaille.JPG|title=Bucailleism|description=Bucailleism is a term used for the movement to relate modern science with religion, principally Islam. Named after the French surgeon Maurice Bucaille, author of The Bible, the Quran and Science, Bucaillists have promoted the idea that the Quran is of divine origin, arguing that it contains scientifically correct facts, and that "one of the main convincing evidences" that lead many to convert to Islam "is the large number of scientific facts in the Quran."|summary=}}
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==Biology==
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== Cosmology ==
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==Cosmology==
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== Islamic practices ==
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==Islamic medicinal practices and rituals==
 
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{{PortalArticle|title=Islamic Medicinal Practices|summary=|image=Blistering.jpeg|description=Islamic scriptures instruct a variety of medicinal practices that have consequently been practiced through centuries, including consuming cumin, drinking camel urine, consuming honey, using indian incense, dipping houseflies in drinks, cupping, and more.}}
== Prominent figures ==
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{{PortalArticle|image=|title=Zakir Naik|description=A medical doctor by training, Naik is famous for theorizing and employing correlations between Islamic scripture and modern science for the purpose of ''dawah'', or proselytism.}}
 
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