Qur'an, Hadith and Scholars:Muhammad and Jihad

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The early Islamic tradition delineates two distinct phases to the career of the prophet: the Meccan period, characterized by peaceful exhortations to the pagan people of Mecca to abandon their gods and embrace Islam, and the Medinan period, characterized by expanding conflicts with neighboring Jewish tribes and the pagans of Mecca. According to the sira and many hadith traditions, during this period Muhammad both ordered and condoned numerous confrontations and assassinations against his enemies in Mecca and Medina. These military operations constitute Jihad, Arabic for struggle, a holy duty incumbent upon all able-bodied Muslim men to engage in armed struggle to expand the reach of Islam. Men who die "on the path of Allah" will be shahids who will enjoy 72 Virgins in paradise, and those who live and are victorious will enjoy divinely-approved booty in this world. The first target of the jihad are the pagans of Mecca and their holy shrine the Ka'bah, however the Qur'an and many of the sayings of the prophet make clear that jihad is a duty incumbent upon all Muslims until "the religion, all of it, is to Allah" (Qur'an 8:39). Muhammad was the leader of these military campaigns and played the role of supreme commander. He also took part in the battles himself, fighting and even being wounded. Jihad was thus a fundamental part of early Islam according to its own tradition and a central occupation of its prophet.

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Abu Dawud

... He asked: AbuHamzah, did you fight with the Apostle of Allah? He replied: Yes. I fought with him in the battle of Hunayn. The polytheists came out and invaded us so severely that we saw our horses behind our backs. Among the people (i.e. the unbelievers) there was a man who was attacking us, and striking and wounding us (with his sword). Allah then defeated them. They were then brought and began to take the oath of allegiance to him for Islam...

Ibn Ishaq

A man of Aslum, who had a good memory, told me that Abu Jahl passed by the apostle at al-Safa, insulted him and behaved most offensively, speaking spitefully of his religion and trying to bring him into disrepute. The apostle did not speak to him. Now a freedwoman, belonging to 'Abdullah b. Jud'an b. 'Amr b. Ka'b b. Sa'd b. Taym b. Murra, was in her house listening to what went on. When he went away he betook himself to the assembly of Quraysh at the Ka'ba and sat there. Within a little while Hamza b. 'Abdu'I-Muttalib arrived, with his bow hanging from his shoulder, returning from the chase, for he was fond of hunting and used to go out shooting. When he came back from a hunt he never went home until he had circumambulated the Ka'ba, and that done when he passed by an assembly of the Quraysh he stopped and saluted and talked with them. He Was the strongest man of Quraysh, and the most unyielding. The apostle had gone back to his house when he passed by this woman, who asked him if he had heard of what Abu'I-Hakam b. Hisham had done just recently to his nephew, Muhammad; how he had found him sitting quietly there, and insulted him, and cursed him, and treated him badly, and that Muhammad had answered not a word. Hamza was filled with rage, for God purposed to honour him, so 'he went out at a run and did not stop to greet anyone, meaning to punish Abu Jahl when he met him. When he got to the mosque he saw him sitting among the people, and went up to him until he stood over him, when he lifted up his bow and struck him a violent blow with it, saying, 'Will you insult him when I follow his religion, and say what he says? Hit me back if you can!' Some of B. Makhzum got up to go. to Abu Jahl's help, but he said, 'Let Abu 'Umara alone for, by God, insulted his nephew deeply.' Hamza's Islam was complete, and he followed. the apostle's commands. When he became a Muslim the Quraysh recognized that the apostle had become strong, and had found a protector in Hamza, and so they abandoned some of their ways of harassing him.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 131-132, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 292, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
When 'Amr and 'Abdullah came to the Quraysh, not having been able to bring back the prophet's companions and having received a sharp rebuff from the Negus, and when Umar became a Muslim, he being a strong, stubborn man whose proteges none dare attack, the prophet's companions were so fortified by him and Hamza that they got the upper hand of Quraysh. Abdullah b. Mas'ud used to say, 'We could not pray at the Ka'ba until Umar became a Muslim, and then he fought the Quraysh until he could pray there and we prayed with him.' 'Umar became a Muslim after the prophet's companions had migrated to Abyssinia.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 155, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 342, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Of B. 'Amr b. 'Auf b. Malik: Sa'd b. Khaythama a 'leader' who was present at Badr and was killed there as a martyr beside the apostle Rifa'a b. 'Abdu'I-Mundhir, a leader present at Badr. 'Abdullah b. Jubay; b. al-Nu'man b. Umayya b. aI-Burak, the name of aI-Burak being Imru'u'l-Qays b. Tha'laba b. 'Amr who was present at Badr and was killed as a martyr at Uhud commanding the archers for the apostle. And Ma'an b. 'Adiy b. aI-Jad b. aI-'AjIan b. Haritha b. Dubay'a, a client of theirs from Baliy present at Badr, Uhud, and aI-Khandaq and all the apostle's battles. He was killed in the battle of aI-Yamama as a martyr in the caliphate of Abu Bakr and 'Uwaym b. Sa'ida who was present at Badr Uhud and al-Khandaq. Total 5.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 209, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 456, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then the apostle prepared for war in pursuance of God's command to fight his enemies and to fight those polytheists who were near at hand whom God commanded him to fight. This was thirteen years after his call.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 280, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 590, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
When they came to the apostle, he said, 'I did not order you to fight in the sacred month,' and he held the caravan and the two prisoners in suspense and refused to take anything from them. When the apostle said that, the men were in despair and thought that they were doomed. Their Muslim brethren reproached them for what they had done, and the Quraysh said 'Muhammad his companions have violated the sacred month, shed blood therein, taken booty, and captured men.' The Muslims in Mecca who opposed them said that they had done it in Sha'ban. The Jews turned this raid into an omen against the apostle. 'Amr b. al-Hadrami whom Waqid had killed they said meant 'amarati'l-harb (war has come to life), al-Hadrami meant hadarati'l-harb (war is present), and Waqid meant waqadati'l-harb (war is kindled); but God turned this against them, not for them, and when there was much talk about it, God sent down to his apostle: 'They will ask you about the sacred month, and war in it. Say war therein is a serious matter, but keeping people from the way of God and disbelieving in Him and in the sacred mosque and driving out His people therefrom is more serious with God.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 287-288, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 603-604, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Abu Bakr said concerning 'Abdullah's raid (though others say that 'Abdullah himself said it), when Quraysh said, 'Muhammad and his companions have broken the sacred month, shed blood therein and taken booty and made prisoners':
You count war in the holy month a grave matter
But graver is, if one judges rightly,
Your opposition to Muhammad's teaching, and your
Unbelief in it, which God sees and witnesses,
Your driving God's people from his mosque
So that none can be seen worshipping Him there.
Though you defame us for killing him,
More dangerous to Islam is the sinner who envies
Our lances drank the blood of Ibn al-Hadrami's blood
In Nakhla when Waqid lit the flame of war,
'Uthman ibn 'Abdullah is with us,
A leather band streaming with blood restrains him.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 288-289, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 605-606, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then the apostle went forth to the people and incited them saying, 'By God in whose hand is the soul of Muhammad, no man will be slain this day fighting against them with steadfast courage advancing not retreating but God will cause him to enter Paradise' 'Umayr b. aI-Humam brother of B. Salima was eating some dates which he had in his hand. 'Fine, Fine!' said he, 'is there nothing between me and my entering Paradise save to be killed by these men?' He flung the dates from his hand, seized his sword, and fought against them till he- was slain, [saying the while
In God's service take no food
But piety and deeds of good.
If in God's war you've firmly stood
You need not fear as other's should
While you are righteous true and good.]
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 300, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 627, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
When the apostle said, '70,000 of my people shall enter Paradise like the full moon' 'Ukkasha asked if he could be one of them, and the apostle prayed that he might become one. One of the Ansar got up and asked that he too might become one of them, and he replied, 'Ukkasha has forestalled you and the prayer is cold.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 305, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 638, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then the apostle went forward until when he came out of the pass of al-Safra' he halted on the sandhill between the pass and al-Naziya called Sayar at a tree there and divided the booty which God had granted to the Muslims equally.' Then he marched until he reached Rauha' when the Muslims met him congratulating him and the Muslims on the victory God had given him. Salama b. Salama--so 'Asim b. 'Umar b. Qatada and Yaz'id b. Ruman told me--said, 'What are you congratulating us about? By God, we only met some bald old women like the sacrificial camels who are hobbled, and we slaughtered them!' The apostle smiled and said, 'But, nephew, those were the chiefs'. When the apostle was in al-'Safra', al-Nadr was killed by 'Ali, as a learned Meccan told me. When he was in 'Irqu'l-Zabya 'Uqba was killed. He had been captured by 'Abdullah b. Salima, one of the B. al-'Ajlan.
When the apostle ordered him to be killed 'Uqba said, 'But who will look after my children, O Muhammad?' 'Hell', he said, and 'Asim b. Thabit b. Abu'l-Aqlah al-Ansari killed him according to what Abu 'Ubayda b. Muhammad b. 'Ammar b. Yasir told me.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 308, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 643-644, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
See Also Al-Tabari, Vol. 7, p. 65
When those who had gone out to Zaynab returned Hind d. 'Utba met them and said:
In peace are you wild asses--rough and coarse
And in war like women in their courses?

Kinan b. al-Rabi' when he handed Zaynab over to the two men said:

I am astonished at Habbar and the paltry ones of his people
Who wish me to break my word with Muhammad's daughter.
I care not for their numbers as long as I live
And as long as my hand can grasp my trusty blade
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 316, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 656-657, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then God said, 'O you that believe, obey God and His apostle, turn not away from him while you are listening.' i.e. Do not contradict his orders when you hear him speak and while you assert that you are on his side.
'And be not like those who said, "We hear" when they did not hear.' i.e. Like the hypocrites who pretend to be obedient and are secretly disobedient to him.
'The worst of beasts with God are the deaf and the dumb who do not understand.' i.e. The hypocrites whom I have forbidden you to imitate. Dumb in reference to good, deaf to truth, not understanding and not knowing the vengeance and consequence which will come upon them.
'Had God known that there was good among them, He would have made them listen.' i.e. In performing for them the words which they spoke with their tongues, but their hearts contradicted them, and if they had come forth with you, 'they would have turned their backs, going aside.' i.e. Would not have been faithful to you in the purpose for which they had come out.
'O you who believe, respond to God and the apostle when he summons you to that which will quicken you.' i.e. to the war in which God exalted you after humiliation, and made you strong after weakness, and protected you from your enemies after you had been overcome by them.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 322-323, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 669, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
II will cast terror into the hearts of those who disbelieve, so strike off their heads and cut off all their fingers, because they opposed God and His apostle and he who opposes God and His apostle (will find) God severe in punishment.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 322, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 667-668, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then He admonished and instructed and taught them how they ought to conduct their wars and said: 'O believers, when you meet an army' whom you fight in the way of God 'Stand firm and remember God often' to Whom you devoted yourselves when you gave your allegiance to Him 'so that you may prosper. And obey God and his apostle and wrangle not lest you fail,' i.e. do not quarrel so that your affairs become disordered 'and your spirit depart.' i.e. your bravery go, 'and be steadfast. God is with the steadfast,' i.e. I am with you when you do that. 'And be not like those who went forth from their houses boastfully to be seen of men,' i.e. do not be like Abu Jahl and his companions who said, 'We will not go back until we have been to Badr and slaughtered camels there and drunk wine and the singing girls have made music for us and the Arabs will hear of it,' i.e. let not your affair be outward show and the subject of gossip, nor concerned with men, and purify your intention towards God and your efforts for the victory of your religion and the help of your prophet. Simply do that and do not aim at anything else. Then He said: 'And when Satan made their deeds seem good to them and said, "No man can conquer you today for I am your protector'".

Then God mentions the unbelievers and what they will meet when they die, and describes them, and tells His prophet about them until He says: 'If you come upon them in war, deal with them so forcibly as to terrify those who follow them, haply they may take warning,' i.e. make a severe example of them to those that come after, that haply they may understand. 'And prepare what strength you can against them, and cavalry by which you may strike terror into the enemy of God and your enemy' as far as His words, 'And whatever you spend in the way of God will be repaid to you: you will not be wronged,' i.e. you will not lose your reward with God in the next life and a rapid recompense in this world. Then He said, 'And if they incline to peace incline thou to it,' i.e. if they ask you for peace on the basis of Islam then make peace on that basis, 'and rely on God,' verily God will suffice thee, 'He is the Hearer, the Knower'. 'And if they would deceive thee, God is sufficient for thee,' He being behind thee, 'He it is who strengthens thee with His help' after weakness 'and by the believers. And He made them of one mind' by the guidance with which God sent thee to them. 'Hadst thou spent all the world's wealth thou hadst not made them of one mind but God made them of one mind' by His religion to which He gathered them. 'He is mighty, wise.'
Then He said: 'O prophet, God is sufficient for thee and the believers who follow thee. O prophet, exhort the believers to fight. If there are twenty steadfast ones among you they will overcome two hundred, and if there are a hundred of you they will overcome a thousand unbelievers for they are a senseless people,' i.e. they do not fight with a good intention nor for truth nor have they knowledge of what is good and what is evil.
'Abdullah b. Abu Najih from 'Ata' b. Abu Ribah from 'Abdullah b. 'Abbas told me that when this verse came down it came as a shock to the

Muslims who took it hard that twenty should have to fight two hundred, and a hundred fight a thousand. So God relieved them and cancelled the verse with another saying: 'Now has God relieved you and He knows that there is weakness amongst you, so if there are a hundred steadfast they shall overcome two hundred, and if there are a thousand of you they shall overcome two thousand by God's permission, for God is with the steadfast.' (Abdullah) said, 'When they numbered half of the enemy it was wrong for them to run from them; but if they were less than half they were not bound to fight and it was permissible for them to withdraw.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 325-326, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 1, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 673-675, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
They walked on farther and he did the same so that Ka'b suspected no evil. Then after a space he did it for the third time, and cried, 'Smite the enemy of God!' So they smote him, and their swords clashed over him with no effect. Muhammad b. Maslama said, 'I remembered my dagger when I saw that our swords were useless, and I seized it. Meanwhile the enemy of God had made such a noise that every fort around us \vas showing a light. I thrust it into the lower part of his body, then I bore down upon it until I reached his genitals, and the enemy of God fell to the ground.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 368, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 56, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The apostle said, 'Kill any Jew that falls into your power.' Thereupon Muhayyisa b. Mas'ud leapt upon Ibn Sunayna, a Jewish merchant with whom they had social and business relations, and killed him. Huwayyisa was not a Muslim at the time though he was the elder brother. When Muhayyisa killed him Huwayyisa began to beat him, saying, 'You enemy of God, did you kill him when much of the fat on your belly comes from his wealth?' Muhayyisa answered, 'Had the one who ordered me to kill him ordered me to kill you I would have cut your head off.' He said that this was the beginning of Huwayyisa's acceptance of Islam. The other replied. 'By God, if Muhammad had ordered you to kill me would you have killed me?' He said, 'Yes, by God, had he ordered me to cut off your head I would have done so.' He exclaimed, 'by God, a religion which can bring you to this is marvellous!' and he became a Muslim.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 369, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 58, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The apostle went on until he came down the gorge of Uhud on the high ground of the wadi towards the mountain. He put his camels and army towards Uhud and said, 'Let none of you fight until we give the word.' Now Quraysh had let their camels and horses loose to pasture in some crops which were in al-Samgha, a part of Qanat belonging to the Muslims. When the apostle had forbidden them to fight one of the Ansar said, 'Are the crops of the B. Qayla to be grazed on without our striking a blow?' The apostle drew up his troops for battle, about 700 men. He put over the archers 'Abdullah b. Jubayr brother of B. 'Amr b. 'Auf who was distinguished that day by his white garments. There were 50 archers, and he said, 'Keep the cavalry away from us with your arrows and let them not come on us from the rear whether the battle goes in our favor or against us; and keep your place so that we cannot be got at from your direction.' The apostle then put on two coats of mail and delivered the standard to Mus'ab b. 'Umayr, brother of B. 'Abdul'l-Dar.

The Quraysh mustered their troops about 3,000 men with 200 horses which they had led along with them. Their calvary on the left flank was commanded by Khalid b. al-Walid; and on the right by 'Ikrima b. Abu Jahl.
[M. The apostle wore two coats of mail on the day of Uhud, and he took up a sword and brandished it saying] 'Who will take this sword with its right?' Some men got up to take it but he withheld it from them until Abu Dujana Simak b. Kharasa, brother of B. Sa'ida, got up to take it. [M. 'Umar got up to take it, saying, 'I will take it with its right,' but the prophet turned away from him and brandished it a second time using the same words. Then al-Zubayr b. al-'Awwam got up and he too was rejected, and the two of them were much mortified. Then Abu Dujana, &c.] He asked, 'What is its right, O apostle of God?' He answered 'That you should smite the enemy with it until it bends.' When he said that he would take it with its right he gave it to him. Now Abu Dujana was a brave but conceited man in battle and whenever he put on this red turban of his, people knew that he was about to fight. When he took the sword from the apostle's hand [he began to walk to the fight saying:

I'm the man who took the sword
When 'Use it right' was the prophet's word.
For the sake of God, of all the Lord
Who doth to all their food afford.]

And he began to strut up and down between the lines.

Ja'far b. 'Abdullah b. Aslam, client of 'Umar b. al-Khattab, told me on the authority of one of the Ansar of B. Salama that the apostle said when he saw Abu Dujana strutting, 'This is a gait which Allah hates except on an occasion like this.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 373-374, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 65-67, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Abu Dujana said, 'I saw a person inciting the enemy, shouting violently, and I made for him, and when I lifted my sword against him, he shrieked, and, it was a woman; I respected the apostle's sword too much to use it on a woman.'

Hamza fought until he killed Arta b. 'Abdu Shurahbil b. Hashim b. 'Abdu Manaf b. 'Abdu'l-Dar who was one of those who were carrying the standard. Then Siba' b. 'Abdu'l-'Uzza al-Ghubshani, who was known as Abu Niyar, passed by him, and Hamza said, 'Come here, you son of a female circumciser.' Now his mother was Umm Anmar, freedwoman of Shariq b. 'Amr b. Wahb al-Thaqafi, a female circumciser in Mecca. When they closed Hamza smote him and killed him.

Wahshi, the slave of Jubayr b. Mut'im, said, 'By God, was looking at Hamza while he was killing men with his sword, sparing no one, like a huge camel, I when Siba' came up to him before me, and Hamza said, "Come here, you son of a female circumciser," and he struck him a blow so swiftly that it seemed to miss his head. I poised my javelin until I was sure that it would hit the mark, and launched it at him. It pierced the lower part of his body and came out between his legs. He came on towards me, but collapsed and fell. I left him there until he died, when I came and recovered my. javelin. Then I went off to the camp, for I had no business with anyone but him.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 375, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 69-70, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then God sent down His help to the Muslims and fulfilled His promise. They slew the enemy with the sword until they cut them off from their camp and there was an obvious rout.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 379, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 77, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Hassan also said about 'Amra and her raising the standard:
When 'Adal were driven to us
They were like fawns of Shirk
With strongly marked eyebrows.
We attacked them thrusting, slaying, chastising,
Driving them before us with blows on every side.
Had not the Harithite woman seized their standard
They would have been sold in the markets like chattels
The Muslims were put to flight and the enemy slew many of them. It was a day. of trial and testing in which God honoured several with martyrdom, until the enemy got at the apostle who was hit with a stone so that he fell on his side and one of his teeth was smashed, his face scored and his lip injured. The man who wounded him was 'Utba b. Abu Waqqas.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 380, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 79, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The army had fled away from the apostle until some of them went as far as al-Munaqqa near al-A'was. 'Asim b. 'Umar b. Qatada from Mahmud b. Labid told me that when the apostle went out to Uhud Husayl b. Jabir, who was al-Yaman Abu Hudhayfa b. al-Yaman, and Thabit b. Waqsh were sent up into the forts with the women and children. They were both old men and one said to the other, 'What are you waiting for, confound you? Neither of us will live much longer. We are certain to die today or tomorrow, so let us take our swords and join the apostle. Perhaps God will grant us martyrdom with him.' So they took their swords and sallied out until they mingled with the army. No one knew anything about them. Thabit was killed by the polytheists and Husayl by the swords of the Muslims, who killed him without recognizing him. Hudhayfa said, 'It is my father.' They said, 'By God, we did not know him,' and they spoke the truth. Hudhayfa said. 'May God forgive you, for He is most compassionate.' The apostle wanted to pay his blood-money, but Hudhayfa gave it as alms to the Muslims and that increased his favour with the apostle.
'Asim also told me that a man called Hatib b. Umayya b. Rafi', who had a son called Yazid, was grievously wounded at Uhud and was brought to his people's settlement at the point of death. His kinsmen gathered round and the men and women began to say to him, 'Good news of the garden (of paradise), a son of Hatib.' Now Hatib was an old man who had lived long in the heathen period and his hypocrisy appeared then, for he said, 'What good news do you give him? Of a garden of rue? By God, you have robbed this man of his life by your deception (and brought great sorrow on me.' Tab.)
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 383, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 87-88, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
My father Ishaq from shaykhs of the B. Salama told me that 'Amr b. al-Jamuh was a man who was very lame. He had four lion-like sons who were present at the apostle's battles. On the day of Uhud they wanted to detain him, saying that God had excused him. He came to the apostle and told him that his sons wanted to keep him back and prevent his joining the army, 'Yet by God, I hope to tread the heavenly garden despite my lameness.' The apostle said, 'God has excused you, and Jihad is not incumbent on you;' and to his sons he said, 'You need not prevent him; perhaps God Will favour him with martyrdom,' so he went along with him and was killed at Uhud.

According to what Salih b. Kaysan told me, Hind d. 'Utba and the women with her stopped to mutilate the apostle's dead companions. They cut off their ears and noses and Hind made them into anklets and collars and gave her anklets and collars and pendants to Wahshi, the slave of Jubayr b. Mut'im. She cut out Hamza's liver and chewed it, but she was not able to swallow it and threw it away. Then she mounted a high rock and shrieked at the top of her voice:

We have paid you back for Badr
And a war that foIlows a war is always violent.
I could not bear the loss of 'Utba
Nor my brother and his uncle and my first-born.
I have slaked my vengeance and fulfilled my vow.
You, 0 Wahshi, have assuaged the burning in my breast.
I shall thank Wahshi as long as I live
Until my bones rot in the grave.

Hind d. Uthatha b. 'Abbad b. al-Muttalib answered her:

You were disgraced at Badr and after Badr,
a daughter of a despicable man, great only in disbelief.
God brought on you in the early dawn
Tall and white-skinned men from Hashim,
Everyone slashing with his sharp sword:
Hamza my lion and 'Ali my falcon.
When Shayba and your father planned to attack me
They reddened their breasts with blood.
Your evil vow was the worst of vows.

Hind d. 'Utba also said:

I slaked my vengeance on Hamza at Uhud.
I split his belly to get at his liver.
This took from me what I had felt
Of burning sorrow and exceeding pain.
War will hit you exceeding hard
Coming upon you as lions advance.

Salih b. Kaisan told me that he was told that 'Umar said to Hassan, 'O Ibn al-Furay'a, I wish you had heard what Bind said and seen her arrogance as she stood upon a rock uttering her taunts against us, reminding us of what she had done to Hamza.' Hassan replied, 'I was looking at the lance as it fell, while I was On the top of Fari'--meaning his fort--land I realized that it was not one of the weapons of the Arabs. It seemed to me as though it was directed at Hamza, but I was not sure. But recite me some of her verse: I will rid you of her.' So 'Umar quoted some of what she said and Hassan said:

The vile woman was insolent: her habits were vile;
Seeing that disbelief accompanied her insolence.
Al-Hulays b. Zabban, brother of the B. al-Harith b. 'Abdu Manat, who was then chief of the black troops, passed by Abu Sufyan as he was striking the side of Hamza's mouth with the point of his spear saying, 'Taste that, you rebel.' Hulays exclaimed, 'O B. Kinana, is this the chief of Quraysh acting thus with his dead cousin as you see?' He said, 'Confound you. Keep the matter quiet, for it was a slip.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 385-386, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 91-93, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
My uncle Musa b. Yasar told me that he heard Abu Hurayra say: Abu'l Qasim [Muhammad] said, 'There is none wounded for God's sake but God wiII raise him on the resurrection day with his wounds bleeding, the colour that of blood, the smell like musk.'
My father Ishaq b. Yasar told me on the authority of shaykhs of the B. Salama that when the apostle ordered the dead to be buried he said, 'Look out for 'Amr b. aI-Jamuh and 'Abdullah b. 'Amr b. Haram; they were close friends in this world, so put them in one grave.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 388, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 98, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
When the apostle rejoined his family he handed his sword to his daughter Fatima, saying, wash the blood from this, daughter, for by God it has served me well today.' 'Ali also handed her his sword and said 'This one too, wash the blood from it, for by God it has served me well today.' The apostle said, 'If you have fought well, Sahl b. Hunayf and Abu Dujana fought well with you'.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 389, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 100, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The day of Uhud was a day of trial, calamity, and heart-searching on which God tested the believers and put the hypocrites on trial, those who professed faith with their tongue and hid unbelief in their hearts; and a day in which God honoured with martyrdom those who he willed.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 391, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 105, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'God helped you at Badr when you were contemptible, so fear God that you may be thankful,' i.e. fear Me, for that is gratitude for My kindness.
'God helped you at Badr' when your numbers and strength were inferior 'when thou didst say to the believers: "Is it not enough for you that your Lord reinforced you with three thousand angels sent down? Nay, if you are steadfast and fear God and they come on you suddenly your Lord will reinforce you with five thousand angels cIearly marked,'" i.e. if you are steadfast against My enemy and obey My command and they come on you recklessly I will reinforce you with five thousand angels clearly marked.
'God did this only as good news for you that your hearts might be at rest therein. Victory comes only from God, the Mighty the Wise,' i.e. I mentioned the armies of My angels only as good news for you and that your hearts might be at rest therein, because I know your weakness and victory comes only from Me because of My sovereignty and power for the reason that power and authority belong to Me, not to anyone of my creatures.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 392, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 106-107, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then He said: 'And with how many a prophet have myriads been slain and they waxed not faint at what befell them in the way of God and were not weak nor humiliated for God loves the steadfast,' i.e. how many a prophet has death (in battle) befallen and many myriads with him, i.e. a multitude, and they waxed not faint at the loss of their prophet nor showed weakness towards their enemies and were not humiliated when they suffered in the fight for God and their religion. That is steadfastness and God loves the steadfast.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 395, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 112, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then He said: 'This is a plain statement to men and guidance and admonition to those that fear God,' i.e. this is an explanation to men if they receive guidance; 'and guidance and admonition,' i.e. a light and discipline 'to those who fear,' i.e. to those who obey Me and know My commandment; 'and do not wax faint or be sad,' i.e. do not become weak and despair at what has befallen you 'you being the superiors,' i.e. you will have the victory 'if you believe,' i.e. if you had believed in what My prophet brought from Me. 'If you have received a shock the (Meccan) army received a shock likewise,' i.e. wounds like yours. 'These are days which We alternate among men,' i.e. we change them among men for trial and search; 'and that God may know those who believe and may choose martyrs from among you, and God loves not wrongdoers,' i.e. to distinguish between believers and hypocrites and to honour some of the faithful with martyrdom.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 394, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 110, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then He said: 'Or do you think that you will enter the garden when God does not yet know those of you who are energetic and steadfast?' i.e. Do you think that you will enter the garden and receive the honour of My reward when I have not tested you with hardship and tried you with misfortune so that I may know your loyalty by faith in Me, and steadfastness in what has befallen you through Me? 'And you used to wish' for martyrdom when you were in the way of truth before you met your enemy. He means those who urged the apostle to take them out against their enemy because they had not been present at the battle of Badr before that and longing for the martyrdom which they had escaped there. He said: 'And you used to wish for death before you met it.' He says: 'Now you have seen it with your eyes!' i.e. death by swords in the hands of men with nothing between you and them while you looked on. Then He kept them back from you. 'And Muhammad is nothing but an apostle; apostles have passed away before him. Will it be that if he dies or is killed you will turn back on your heels? He who so turns back will not harm God at all, and God will reward the thankful' in reference to the men saying 'Muhammad has been killed' and their flight thereat and breaking away from their enemy.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 394, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 110-111, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
I carried out My promise to give you victory over your enemy when you routed them with the sword, i.e. killing them by My permission and My giving you power over them and keeping them from you' 'Until you failed,' i.e. deserted and disagreed about the order; i.e. you disputed about My order, i.e. you abandoned the order of your prophet and what he had told you to do, meaning the archers. 'After He had shown you what. You were desiring,' i.e. victory about which there was no doubt and the flight of the (Meccan) army from their wives and property. 'Some of you desired this world,' i.e. those who desired the spoil in this world and abandoned their orders which carried the reward of the hereafter; 'and some of you desired the hereafter" i.e. those who fought for God's sake and did not transgress in going after what they had been forbidden for an accident of this world out of desire for it, hoping for the fine reward that is with God hereafter; i.e. those who fought for religion and did not transgress in going after what they had been forbidden for an accident' of this world. 'To try you' for some of your sins. God pardoned the great sin in that He did not destroy you for having disobeyed your prophet. But I restored My kindness to you. 'And thus God favours the believers.' He punished some sins at once in this world by way of discipline and admonition, but He did not exterminate all for the debt they owed Him because they suffered for disobeying Him, out of mercy to them and as a reward for such faith as they had.
Then He reproached them for running away from. their prophet and paying no heed when he called to them: 'When you climbed up and paid no heed to anyone while the apostle was calling behind you, He rewarded you with grief for grief, that you might not be sad for what you missed and for what befell you,' i.e. grief after grief by the killing of some of your brethren and your enemy getting the better of you, and what you felt when someone said your prophet had been killed.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 396, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 114, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then He said: 'So forgive them,' i.e. overlook their offence 'and ask pardon' for their sins: the people of faith who did wrong. 'And consult them about the matter', to show them that you listen to them and ask their help, even if you are independent of them, thereby making their religion agreeable to them. 'And when thou art resolved' on a matter which has come from Me and a matter of religion concerning fighting your enemy when only that will bring you and them advantage, then do as you have been ordered despite the opposition of those who oppose you and in agreement with those who agree with you
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 398, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 116-117, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Isma'il b. Umayya told me from Abu'l-Zubayr from Ibn 'Abbas: The apostle said when your brethren were slain at Uhud, 'God has put their spirits in the crops of green birds which come down to the rivers of the Garden; they eat of its fruits and come home to where there are golden candlesticks in the shadow of the throne; and when they experience the goodly drink and food and their beautiful resting-place they say: Would that our brethren knew what God has done with us that they might not dislike fighting and shrink from war!' And God says 'I will tell them of you' so He sent down to His apostle these verses 'And do not think,' &c.

AI-Harith b. al-Fudayl told me from Mahmud b. Labid al-Ansari from Ibn 'Abbas: The martyrs are at Bariq, a river at the gate of the Garden, in a green tent, their provision from the Garden coming out to them morning and evening.

One whom I do not suspect told me from 'Abdullah b. Mas'ud that he was asked about these verses 'Do not think', &c., and he said, We asked about them and we were told that when your brethren were slain at Uhud God put their spirits in the crops of green birds which come down to the rivers of the Garden and eat of its fruits and come home to where there are golden candlesticks in the shade of the throne and God takes one look at them and says, 'O My servants, what do you wish that I should give you more?' And they say, 'O our Lord, there is nothing beyond the Garden which Thou hast given us from which we eat when we please.' After the question has been put three times they say the same, adding, 'except that we should like our spirits to return to our bodies and then return to the earth and fight for Thee until we are killed again.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 400, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 119-120, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Thus God killed on the day of Uhud 22 polytheists.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 403, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 129, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Poetry on the Battle of Uhud:

Hubayra b. Abu Wahb b. 'Amr b. 'A'idh b. 'Abd b. 'Imran b. Makhzum:

Why does this painful anxiety afflict me at night?
My love for Hind beset by cares.
Hind keeps blaming and reproaching me
While war has distracted me from her.
Gently now, blame me not; 'tis my habit
As you know I have never concealed it.
I help the B. Ka'b as they demand
Struggling with the burdens they impose.
I bore my arms bestride a noble horse
Long of pace, smooth in gait, keeping up with the cavalry's gallop,
Running like a wild ass in the desert which
Pursued by hunters keeps close to the females. [...]
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 404, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 129-130, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Ka'b b. Malik answered the two of them:
Tell Quraysh (the best word is the truest and truth is always acceptable to the wise)
That we killed your best men, the standard-bearers,
In revenge for our slain, so what is all the talk about?
And on the day that we met you
Michael and Gabriel reinforced and helped us.
If you kill us the true religion is ours
And to be killed for the truth is to find God's favour.
If you think that we are fools
The opinion of those who oppose Islam is misleading.
Do not wish for more war but stay at home,
The habitual man of war is blood-stained, never free of care.
You will get such blows at our hands
That the hyaenas will rejoice at the lumps of meat.
We are men of war who get the utmost from it
And inflict painful punishment on the aggressors. [...]
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 414-415, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 147-148, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Ka'b b. Malik: [...]
You have said much in insulting God's apostle.
God slay you, you cursed rude fellow!
You utter filth, and then throw it
At the clean robed godly faithful one.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 421, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 161, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Amr got as far as al-Qarqara at the beginning of Qanat when two men of B. 'Amir turned up and stopped with him in the shade. Now there was an agreement of friendship between the apostle and the two 'Amiris of which 'Amr knew nothing, and when after questioning he found that they belonged to B. Amr he, let them alone for a time until they slept when he fell upon them and killed them, thinking that he had taken vengeance on them for the killing of the apostle's companions. But when he came to the apostle and told him what he had done he said, 'You have killed two men whose bloodwit I must pay.' Then the apostle said 'This is (the result of) Abu Bara's act. I did not like this expedition fearing what would happen.' When Abu Bara' heard the news he was much upset at 'Amir's violation of his guarantee in that the apostle's companions had been killed because of what he had done and because he had promised them safety. Among those who were killed was 'Amir b. Fuhayra.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 434-435, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 186, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Among the verses composed about B. al-Nadir are the following from I. Luqaym al-'Absi. (Others say Qays b. Bahr b. Tarif was the author.) [...]
You had an example at Badr, O Quraysh,
And at the crowded cistern
The morning he attacked you with the Khazrajis,
Obeying the Great and Honoured One,
Helped by the Holy Spirit, smiting his foes,
A true apostle from the Compassionate on high;
An apostle from the Compassionate reciting His book.
When the truth shone forth he did not hesitate.
I see his power mounting on every hand
In accord with God's decree.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 439-440, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 195-196, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Sammak the Jew answered him:
If you boast, for it is a boast for you
That you killed Ka'b b. aI-Ashraf
The day that you compassed his death,
A man who had shown neither treachery nor bad faith,
Haply time and the change of fortune
Will take revenge from 'the just and righteous one'
For killing al-Nadir and their confederates
And for cutting down the palms, their dates ungathered.
Unless I die we will come at you with lances
And every sharp sword that we have
In the hand of a brave man who protects himself.
When he meets his adversary he kills him.
With the army is Sakhr and his fellows.
When he attacks he is no weakling
Like a lion in Tarj protecting his covert,
Lord of the thicket, crushing his prey, enormous.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 441, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 198, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
After the attack on B. al-Nadir the apostle stayed in Medina during Rabi'u'l-Akhir and part of Jumada. Then he raided Najd making for B. Muharib and B. Tha'laba of Ghatafan, until he stopped at Nakhl. This was the raid of Dhatu'l-Riqa'. There a large force of Ghatafan was encountered. The two forces approached one another, but no fighting occurred, for each feared the other. The apostle led the prayer of fear; then he went off with the men.
(T. Muhammad b. Ja'far b. al-Zubayr and Muhammad b. 'Abdu'l-Rahman from 'Urwa b. al-Zubayr from Abu Hurayra: We went with the apostle to Najd until at Dhatu'l-Riqa' he met a number of Ghatafan. There was no fighting because the men were afraid of them. The prayer of fear came down and he divided his companions into two sections, one facing the enemy and the other behind the apostle. The apostle cried 'Allah akbar,' and so did they all. Then he bowed with those behind him, and he and they prostrated themselves. Then-he bowed with those behind him, and he and they prostrated themselves. When they stood erect they walked backwards to the ranks of their companions and the others returned and prayed one bow. Then they stood erect and the apostle prayed one bow with them and they sat. Those who were facing the enemy came back and prayed the second bow and all sat and the apostle united them with the salam, and gave them the Muslim greeting.)
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 445, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 203-204, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Ka'b b. Malik also answered Hubayra: [...]
Among us was God's apostle whose command we obey.
When he gives an order we do not examine it.
The spirit' descends on him from his Lord
Brought down from the midst of heaven and taken up again.
We consult him on our wishes, and our desire
Is to obey him in all that he wants.
The apostle said when they appeared,
'Cast off the fear of death and desire it,
Be like one who sells his life
To draw near to a King by Whom he will be restored to life.
Take your swords and trust in God
To Whom belongs the disposal of all things.'
We made for them openly as they rode their camels
Bearing swords and unafraid
In a compact force with lances and spears;
When our steeds planted their feet they kept them firm.
Into a sea of foemen we plunged,
Their blacks in the centre some in armour some unprotected.

[...]

The battle waged hot between us
And all were made to get their fill of evil.
We are men who see no blame in him who kills
To guard and protect his protegees.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 405-407, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 133-135, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Now, after God has honoured and guided us to Islam and made us famous by you, are we to give them our property? We certainly will not. We will give them nothing but the sword until God decide between us.' The apostle said: 'You shall have it so.' Sad took the paper and erased what was written, saying, 'Let them do their worst against us!'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 454, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 223, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Now 'Amr b. 'Abdu Wudd had fought at Badr until he was disabled by wounds, and so he had not been at Uhud. At the battle of the Trench he came out wearing a distinguishing mark to show his rank, and when he and his contingent stopped he challenged anyone to fight him. 'Ali accepted the challenge and said to him: "Amr, you swore by God that if any man of Quraysh offered you two alternatives you would accept one of them?' 'Yes, I did,' he said. 'Ali replied, 'Then I invite you to God and His apostle and to Islam.' He said that he had no use for them. 'Ali went on, 'Then I call on you to dismount.' He replied, 'O son of my brother, I do not want to kill you.' 'Ali said, 'But I want to kill you.' This so enraged 'Amr that he got off his horse and hamstrung it and (T. or) beat its face; then he advanced on 'Ali, and they fought, the one circling round the other. 'Ali killed him and their cavalry fled, bursting headlong in flight across the trench.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 455, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 225, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The dust rose and the apostle heard the cry, 'Allah Akbar' and knew that 'Ali had killed him [His uncle]. [Suhayli continues:] As he came towards the apostle smiling with joy 'Umar asked him if he had stripped him of his armour, for it was the best that could be found among the Arabs. He answered: 'When I had struck him down he turned his private parts towards me and I felt ashamed to despoil him and moreover he had said that he did not want to shed my blood because my father was a friend of his.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 456, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
Then they surrendered, and the apostle confined them in Medina in the quarter of d. al-Harith, a woman of B. al-Najjar. Then the apostle went out to the market of Medina (which is still its market today) and dug trenches in it. Then he sent for them and struck off their heads in those trenches as they were brought out to him in batches. Among them was the enemy of Allah Huyayy b. Akhtab and Ka'b b. Asad their chief. There were 600 or 700 in all, though some put the figure as high as 800 or 900. As they were being taken out in batches to the apostle they asked Ka'b what he thought would be done with them. He replied, 'Will you never understand? Don't you see that the summoner never stops and those who are taken do not return? By Allah it is death!' This went on until the apostle made an end of them.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 464, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 240-241, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then He said: 'Some of the believers are men who are true to what they covenanted with Allah and some of them have fulfilled their vow in death,' i.e. finished their work and returned to their Lord like those who sought martyrdom at Badr and Uhud.

'And some of them are still waiting,' i.e. for the help which Allah promised them and the martyrdom like that which befell his companions. God said: 'And they have not altered in the least: i.e. they did not doubt nor hesitate in their religion, and did not change it for another. 'That God may reward the true men for their truth and punish the disaffected if He will, or repent towards them. God is forgiving, merciful. And Allah turned back those who disbelieved in their wrath,' i.e. Quraysh and Ghatafan. 'They gained no good. God averted battle from the believers, and Allah is strong, mighty. And He brought down those of the Scripture people who helped them,' i.e. B. Qurayza, 'from their strongholds' the forts and castles in which they were. 'And he cast terror into their hearts; some you slew and some you captured,' i.e. he killed the men and captured the women and children. 'And caused you to inherit their land and their dwellings, and their property, and a land you had not trod,' i.e. Khaybar. 'For Allah can do all things.'

When the affair of B. Qurayza was disposed of, Sa'd's wound burst open and he died a martyr therefrom.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 468, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 249-250, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
On the day of Qurayza there were martyred of the Muslims of B. al-Harith b. al-Khazraj: Khallad b. Suwayd b. Tha'laba b. 'Amr. A millstone was thrown on him and inflicted a shattering wound. They allege that the apostle said, 'He will have the reward of two martyrs.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 469, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 254, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Poetry About the Trench and B. Qurayza:

Dirar b. al-Khattab b. Mirdas brother of B. Muharib b. Fihr said about the battle of the Trench: [...]

Night and morning every day
We attacked them fully armed;
Sharp swords in our hands
Cutting through heads and skulls.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 470, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 255, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Ka'b b. Malik brother of B. Salima answered him: [...]
We have a prophet, a true helper,
By whom we can conquer all men.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 471, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 255-256, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Ka'b b. Malik said about the trench: [...]
God commanded that the horses should be kept for His enemy in the fight
(Truly God is the best guarantor of victory)
That they might vex the enemy and protect the dwellings
If the horses of the miscreants came near.
God the mighty helped us with His strength
And loyal steadfastness on the day of the encounter.
We obeyed our prophet's orders.
When he called for war we were the first to respond.
When he called for violent efforts we made them.
When we saw the battle we hastened thither.
He who obeys the prophet's command (let him do so), for among us
He is obeyed and truly believed.
By this He will give us victory and show our glory
And so give us a life of ease.
Those who call Muhammad a liar
Disbelieve and go astray from the way of the pious.

Ka'b also said:

The mixed tribes knew when they gathered together against us
And attacked our religion that we would not submit.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 474-475, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 261-263, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Muhammad b. Muslim b. Shihab al-Zuhri from Abdullah b. Ka'b b. Malik told me: One of the things which God did for His apostle was that these two tribes of the Ansar, Aus and Khazraj, competed the one with the other like two stallions: if Aus did anything to the apostle's advantage Khazraj would say, 'They shall not have this superiority over us in the apostle's eyes and in Islam' and they would not rest until they could do something similar. If Khazraj did anything Aus would say the same.
When Aus had killed Ka'b for his enmity towards the apostle, Khazraj used these words and asked themselves what man was as hostile to the apostle as Ka'b? And then they remembered Sallam who was in Khaybar and asked and obtained the apostle's permission to kill him.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 482, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 273-274, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Hassan b. Thabit mentioning the killing of Ka'b and Sallam said:
God, what a fine band you met,
O Ibnu'l-Huqayq and Ibnu'l-Ashraf!
They went to you with sharp swords,
Brisk as lions in a tangled thicket,
Until they came on you in your dwelling
And made you drink death with their swift-slaying swords,
Looking for the victory of their prophet's religion
Despising every risk of hurt.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 483-484, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 276, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The Attack on B. Lihyan:

The apostle stayed in Medina during Dhu'l-Hijja, Muharram, Safar, and the two months of Rabi', and in Jumada'l-Ula, six months after the conquest of Qurayza, he went out against B. Lihyan to avenge his men killed at al-Raji', Khubayb b. 'Adiy and his companions. He made as though he was going to Syria in order to take the people by surprise. He went past Ghurab, a mountain near Medina on the road to Syria, then by Mahis, then by al-Batra; then he turned off to the left and came out by Bin, then by Sukhayratu'l-Yamam, then the track went by the Meccan highroad. He quickened the pace until he came down to Ghuran, the haunts of B. Lihyan. (Ghuran is a wadi between Amaj and 'Usfan extending as far as a village called Saya.) He found that the people had been warned and taken up strong positions on the tops of mountains. When the apostle got there and saw that he had failed to take them by surprise as he had intended, he said, 'Were we to come down to 'Usfan the Meccans would think that we intend to come to Mecca.' So he went out with two hundred riders until he came to 'Usfan, when he sent two horsemen from his companions who went as far as Kura'u'l-Ghamim. Then he turned and went back.
Jabir b. 'Abdullah used to say, 'I heard the apostle say when he set his face towards Medina "Returning repentant if God will, giving thanks to our Lord. I take refuge in God from the difficulties of the journey and its unhappy ending, and the evil appearance of man and beast."'
The tradition about the raid on B. Lihyan is from 'Asim b. 'Umar b. Qatada and 'Abdullah b. Abu Bakr from 'Abdullah b. Ka'b b. Malik. Ka'b b. Malik said:

If B. Lihyan had waited
They would have met bands in their settlements, fine fighters.
They would have met audacious warriors whose terror fills the way
In front of an irresistible force glittering like stars.
But they were as weasels who stick to the
Clefts of the rocks, which have no means of escape.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 485-486, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 279-281, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Ka'b b. Malik said concerning the day of Dhu Qarad with reference to the horsemen:
Do the bastards think that we
Are not their equals in horsemanship?
We are men who think killing no shame,
We turn not from the piercing lances.
We feed the guest with choicest camels' meat
And smite the heads of the haughty.
We turn back the conspicuous warriors in their pride
With blows that quash the zeal of the unyielding.
With heroes who protect their standard,
Noble, generous, fierce as jungle wolves.
They preserve their honour and their goods
With swords that smash the heads beneath the helms.
Ask the Banu Badr if you meet them
What the brethren did on the day of battle.
Tell the truth to those you meet whenever you come out.
Conceal not the news in assemblies.
Say, We slipped away from the claws of the angry lion
With rage in his heart which he could not work off.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 489-490, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 287-288, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The Raid on B. al-Mustaliq:

The apostle stayed in Medina during the latter part of the Jumada'l-Akhira and Rajab; then he attacked B. al-Mustaliq of Khuza'a in Sha'ban A.H. 6.

'Asim b. 'Umar b. Qatada and 'Abdullah b. Abu Bakr and Muhammad b. Yahya b. Habban each told me a part of the following story: The apostle received news that B. Mustaliq were gathering together against him, their leader being al-Harith b. Abu Dirar, the father of Juwayriya d. al-Harith (afterwards) wife of the apostle. When the apostle heard about them he went out and met them at a watering place of theirs called al-Muraysi' in the direction of Qudayd towards the shore. There was a fight and God put the B. al-Mustaliq to flight and killed some of them and gave the apostle their wives, children, and property as booty. A Muslim of B. Kalb b. 'Auf b. 'Amir b. Layth b. Bakr called Hisham b. Subaba was killed by a man of the Ansar of the family of 'Ubada b. al-Samit who thought he was an enemy and killed him in error.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 490, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 289-290, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 , See Also Al-Tabari, Vol. 8, p. 51
The apostle said: 'Alas, Quraysh, war has devoured them! What harm would they have suffered if they had left me and the rest of the Arabs to go our own ways? If they should kill me that is what they desire, and if God should give me the victory over them they would enter Islam in flocks. If they do not do that they will fight while they have the strength, so what are Quraysh thinking of? By Allah, I will not cease to fight for the mission with which God has entrusted me until He makes it victorious or I perish.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 500, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 309, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
So he came to the apostle and sat before him and said: 'Muhammad, have you collected a mixed people together and then brought them to your own people to destroy them? Quraysh have come out with their milch-camels clad in leopard skins swearing that you shall never enter Mecca by force. By God I think I see you deserted by these people (here) tomorrow.' Now Abu Bakr was sitting behind the apostle and he said, 'Suck al-Lat's nipples [the original Arabic reads badhr, or بظر , which means 'clitoris' and is, for instance, the standard term used in the sanction of FGM in Islamic Law]! Should we desert him?'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 502, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 313, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The Willing Homage:
'Abdullah b. Abu Bakr told me that when the apostle heard that 'Uthman had been killed he said that they would not leave until they fought the enemy, and he summoned the men to give their undertaking. The pledge of al-Ridwan took place under a tree. Men used to say that the apostle took their pledge unto death. Jabir b. 'Abdullah used to say that the apostle did not take their pledge unto death, but rather their undertaking that they would not run away. Not one of the Muslims who were present failed to give his hand except al-Jadd b. Qays, brother of B. Salima. Jabir used to say: 'By Allah, I can almost see him now sticking to his camel's side cringing as he tried to hide himself from the men.' Then the apostle heard that the news about 'Uthman was false
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 503-504, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 315, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
See Also Al-Tabari, Vol. 8, p. 82
'Umar jumped up and walked alongside Abu Jandal saying, 'Be patient for they are only polytheists; the blood of one of them is but the blood of a dog,' and he brought the hilt of his sword close up to him. 'Umar used to say, 'I hoped that he would take the sword and kill his father with it, but the man spared his father and so the matter ended.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 505, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 318-319, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then He said: 'God was pleased with the believers when they swore allegiance to you under the tree and He knew what was in their hearts, and He sent down the Sakina' upon them and rewarded them with a recent victory and much spoil which they will take. God is mighty, wise. God has promised you much spoil which you will capture and has given you this in advance, and kept men's hands from you, that it may be a sign to the believers and that He may guide you on an upright path, and other (things) which you have not been able to get. God encompasses them, and God is almighty.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 506, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 321, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then Abu Basir went off until he halted at al-'Is in the region of Dhu'l-Marwa by the sea-shore on the road which Quraysh were accustomed to take to Syria. The Muslims who were confined in Mecca heard what the apostle had said of Abu Basir so they went out to join him in al-'Is. About seventy men attached themselves to him, and they so harried Quraysh, killing everyone they could get hold of and cutting to pieces every caravan that passed them, that Quraysh wrote to the apostle begging him by the ties of kinship to take these men in, for they had no use for them; so the apostle took them in and they came to him in Medina).
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 507-508, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 324, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 , See Also Al-Tabari, Vol. 8, p. 91
The apostle besieged the people of Khaybar in their two forts al-Watih and al-Sulalim until when they could hold out no longer they asked him to let them go, and spare their lives, and he did so. Now the apostle had taken possession of all their property-al-Shaqq, Nata, and al-Katiba and all their forts---except what appertained to these two. When the people of Fadak heard of what had happened they sent to the apostle asking him to let them go and to spare their lives and they would leave him their property, and he did so. The one who acted as intermediary was Muhayyisa b. Mas'ud, brother of B. Haritha. When the people of Khaybar surrendered on these conditions they asked the apostle to employ them on the property with half share in the produce, saying, 'We know more about it than you and we are better farmers: The apostle agreed to this arrangement on the condition that 'if we wish to expel you we will expel you.' He made a similar arrangement with the men of Fadak. So Khaybar became the prey of the Muslims, while Fadak was the personal property of the apostle because they had not driven horses or camels against it.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 515-516, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 337, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Afterwards he advanced to the fort with the Muslims and was struck by a stone and killed, never having prayed a single prayer. He was brought to the apostle and laid behind him and covered by his shepherd's cloak. The apostle, who was accompanied by a number of his companions, turned towards him and then turned away. When they asked him why, he said, 'He has with him now his two wives from the dark-eyed houris.'
'Abdullah b. Abu Najih, told me that he was told that, when a martyr is slain, his two wives from the dark-eyed houris pet him, wiping the dust from his face, saying the while, 'May God put dust on the face of the man who put dust on your face, and slay him who slew you!'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 519, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 345, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Abdullah b. Abu Bakr told me that when the apostle entered Mecca on that pilgrimage 'Abdullah b. Rawaha was holding the halter of his camel and saying:
Get out of his way, you unbelievers, make way.
Every good thing goes with His apostle.
O Lord I believe in his word,
I know God's truth in accepting it.
We will fight you about its interpretation'
As we have fought you about its revelation
With strokes that will remove heads from shoulders
And make friend unmindful of friend.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 531, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 371, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Ka'b b. Malik said:[...]
'Twas as though between my ribs and bowels
A burning piercing pain afflicted me,
Sorrowing for those who one after another
Were left lying that day in Mu'ta.
God bless them, the heroes,
And may plenteous rains refresh their bones!
They forced themselves for God's sake
To ignore the fear of death and cowardly failure.
They went in front of the Muslims
Like stallion foals, clad in long mail
When they were led by Ja'far and his flag
In front of their leader, and what a fine leader.
Until the ranks were breached and Ja'far
Where the ranks were trapped lay prostrate.
The moon lost its radiance at his death,
The sun eclipsed and wellnigh dark.
A chief of high lineage from Hashim,
In lofty eminence and authority immovable,
A people by whom God protected His servants,
To them was sent down the revealed book.
They excelled other tribes in glory and honour
And their enlightened minds covered up the ignorance of others.
They would not embark on a vicious enterprise,
You could see their speaker deciding justly.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 538, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 385-386, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The apostle said, 'I think you will see Abu Sufyan coming to strengthen the agreement [a peace treaty] and to ask for more time.' [...] Having arrived at Medina he went in to his daughter Umm Habiba [one of Muhammad's wives], and as he went to sit on the apostle's carpet she folded it up so that he could not sit on it. 'My dear daughter,' he said, '! hardly know if you think that the carpet is too good for me or that I am too good for the carpet!' She replied: 'It is the apostle's carpet and you are an unclean polytheist. I do not want you to sit on the apostle's carpet.' 'By God,' he said, 'since you left me you have gone to the bad.' Then he went to the apostle, who would not speak to him; he then went to Abu Bakr and asked him to speak to the apostle for him; he refused to do so. Then he went to 'Umar who said, 'Should I intercede for you with the apostle! If I had only an ant I would fight you with it.' Then he went in to see 'Ali with whom was Fatima the apostle's daughter who had with her 'Ali's little son Hasan crawling in front of her. He appealed to 'Ali on the ground of their close relationship to intercede with the apostle so that he would not have to return disappointed; but he answered that if the apostle had determined on a thing it was useless for anyone to talk to him about it; so he turned to Fatima and said, 'O daughter of Muhammad, will you let your little son here act as a protector between men so that he may become lord of the Arabs for ever?' She replied that her little boy was not old enough to undertake such a task and in any case none could give protection 'against God's apostle. He then asked for 'Ali's advice in the desperate situation. He said, I I do not see anything that can really help you, but you are the chief of B. Kinana, so get up and grant protection between men and then go back home.' When he asked if he thought that that would do any good he replied that he did not, but that he could see nothing else. Thereupon Abu Sufyan got up in the mosque and said, 'O men, I grant protection between men.' He then mounted his camel and rode off to Quraysh who asked for his news. He said that Muhammad would not speak to him, that he got no good from Abu Quhafa's son, and that he found 'Umar an implacable enemy. He had found 'Ali the most helpful and he had done what he recommended, though he did not know whether it would do any good. He told them what he had done and when they asked whether Muhammad had endorsed his words, he had to admit that he had not. They complained that 'Ali had made a fool of him and that his pronouncement was valueless, and he said that he could find nothing else to do or say.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 543-544, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 395-397, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The apostle ordered preparations to be made for a foray and Abu Bakr came in to see his daughter 'A'sha as she was moving some of the apostle's equipment. He asked if the apostle had ordered her to get things ready, and she said that he had, and that her father had better get ready also. She told him that she did not know where the troops were going. Later the apostle informed the men that he was going to Mecca and ordered them to make careful preparations. He said, 'O God, take eyes and ears from Quraysh so that we may take them by surprise in their land,' and the men got themselves ready.

Hassan b. Thabit, inciting the men and mentioning the killing of the men of Khuza'a, said:

It pained me though I did not see in Mecca's valley
The men of Banu Ka'b with their heads cut off
By men who had not drawn their swords
And the many dead who were left unburied.
Would that I knew if my help with its biting satire
Would injure Suhayl b. 'Amr, and Safwan
That old camel who groans from his arse.
This is the time for war--its girths are tightened.
Don't feel safe from us, son of Umm Mujalid,
When its pure milk is extracted and its teeth are crooked.
Don't be disappointed, for our swords
Will open the door to death.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 544-545, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 397-398, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The squadrons passed him with their standards, and he asked who they were. When I said Sulaym he would say, 'What have I to do with Sulaym?' and so with Muzayna until all had passed, he asking the same question and making the same response to the reply. Finally the apostle passed with his greenish-black squadron in which were Muhajirs and Ansar whose eyes alone were visible because of their armour. He said, 'Good heavens, 'Abbas, who are these I' and when I told him he said that none could withstand them. 'By God, O Abu Fadl, the authority of your brother's son has become great.' I told him that it was due to his prophetic office, and he said that in the case he had nothing to say against it.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 548, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 404, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Salama b. al-Mayla', one of Khalid's horsemen, was killed, and the polytheists lost about 12 or 13 men; then they took to flight. Himas ran off and went into his house and told his wife to bolt the door. When she asked what had become of his former words he said:
If you had witnessed the battle of Khandama
When Safwan and 'Ikrima fled
And Abu Yazid was standing like a pillar
And the Muslims met them with their swords
Which cut through arms and skulls,
Only confused cries being heard
Behind us their cries and groans,
You would not have uttered the least word of blame
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 550, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 408-409, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The apostle had instructed his commanders when they entered Mecca only to fight those who resisted them, except a small number who were to be killed even if they were found beneath the curtains of the Ka'ba. Among them was 'Abdullah b. Sa'd, brother of the B. 'Amir b. Lu'ayy. The reason he ordered him to be killed was that he had been a Muslim and used to write down revelation; then he apostatized and returned to Quraysh and fled to 'Uthman b. 'Affan whose foster-brother he was; The latter hid him until he brought him to the apostle after the situation in Mecca was tranquil, and asked that he might be granted immunity. They allege that the apostle remained silent for a long time till finally he said yes. When Uthman had left he said to his companions who were sitting around him, 'I kept silent so that one of you might get up and strike off his head!' One of the Ansar said, 'Then why didn't you give me a sign, a apostle of God I' He answered that a prophet does not kill by pointing.

Another was 'Abdullah b. Khatal of B. Taym b. Ghalib. He had become a Muslim and the apostle sent him to collect the poor tax in company with one of the Ansar. He had with him a freed slave who served him. (He was a Muslim.) When they halted he ordered the latter to kill a goat for him and prepare some food, and went to sleep. When he woke up the man had done nothing, so he attacked and killed him and apostatized. He had two singing-girls Fartana and her friend who used to sing satirical songs about the apostle, so he ordered that they should be killed with him.
Another was al-Huwayrith b. Nuqaydh b. Wahb b. 'Abd b. Qusayy, one of those who used to insult him in Mecca.
Another was Miqyas b. Hubaba because he had killed an Ansarl who had killed his brother accidentally, and returned to Quraysh as a polytheist. And Sara, freed slave of one of the B. 'Abdu'l-Muttalib; and 'Ikrima b. Abu Jahl. Sara had insulted him in Mecca. As for 'Ikrima, he fled to the Yaman. His wife Umm Hakim d. al-Harith b. Hisham became a Muslim and asked immunity for him and the apostle gave it. She went to the Yaman in search of him and brought him to the apostle and he accepted Islam. (T. 'Ikrima used to relate, according to what they say, that what turned him to Islam when he had gone to the Yaman was that he had determined to cross the sea to Abyssinia and when he found a ship the master said, 'O servant of God, you cannot travel in my ship until you acknowledge that God is one and disavow any rival to Him, for I fear that if you do not do so we should perish.' When I asked if none but such persons was allowed to travel in his ship he replied, 'Yes, and he must be sincere.' So I thought: Why should I leave Muhammad when this is what he has brought us? Truly our God on the sea is our God on the dry land. Thereupon I recognized Islam and it entered into my heart.) 'Abdullah b. Khatal was killed by Said b. Hurayth al-Makhzumi and Abu Barza al-Aslami acting together. Miqyas was killed by Numayla b. 'Abdullah, one of his own people. Miqyas's sister said of his killing:

By my life, NumayIa shamed his people
And distressed the winter guests when he slew Miqyas.
Whoever has seen a man like Miqyas
Who provided food for young mothers in hard times.

As for Ibn Khatal's two singing-girls, one was killed and the other ran away until the apostle, asked for immunity, gave it her. Similarly Sara, who lived until in the time of 'Umar a mounted soldier trod her down in the valley of Mecca and killed her. AI-Huwayrith was killed by 'Ali.

Sa'id b. Abu Hind from Abu Murra, freed slave of 'Aqil b. Abu Talib, told me that Umm Hani' d. Abu Talib said: When the apostle halted in the upper part of Mecca two of my brothers-in-law from B. Makhzum fled to me. (She was the wife of Hubayra b. Abu Wahb al-Makhzumi) 'Ali came in swearing that he would kill them, so I bolted the door of my house on them and went to the apostle and found him washing in a large bowl in which was the remains of dough while his daughter Fatima was screening him with his garment.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 550-551, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 409-411, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Muhammad b. Ja'far b. al-Zubayr from 'Ubaydullah b. 'Abdullah b. Abu Thaur from Safiya d. Shayba told me that the apostle after arriving in Mecca when the populace had settled down went to the temple and encompassed it seven times on his camel touching the black stone with a stick which he had in his hand. This done he summoned 'Uthman b. Talha and took the key of the Ka'ba from him, and when the door was opened for him he went in. There he found a dove made of wood. He broke it in his hands and threw it away. Then he stood by the door of the Ka'ba while the men in the mosque gathered to him.

[I.I. from 'Abdullah b. Abu Bakr from 'Ali b. 'Abdullah b. 'Abbas: The apostle entered Mecca on the day of the conquest and it contained 360 idols which Iblis' had strengthened with lead. The apostle was standing by them with a stick in his hand, saying, 'The truth has come and falsehood has passed away; verily falsehood is sure to pass away' (Sura 7. 82). Then he pointed at them with his stick and they collapsed on their backs one after the other.
When the apostle prayed the noon prayer on the day of the conquest he ordered that all the idols which were round the Ka'ba should be collected and burned with fire and broken up. Fadala b. al-Mulawwih al-Laythi said commemorating the day of the conquest:

Had you seen Muhammad and his troops
The day the idols were smashed when he entered,
You would have seen God's light become manifest
And darkness covering the face of idolatry.
I.I. from Hakim b. 'Abbad b. Hanif and other traditionists: Quraysh had put pictures in the Ka'ba including two of Jesus son of Mary and Mary (on both of whom be peace!). I. Shihab said: Asma' d. Shaqr said that a woman of Ghassan joined in the pilgrimage of the Arabs and when she saw the picture of Mary in the Ka'ba she said, 'My father and my mother be your ransom! You are surely an Arab woman!' The apostle ordered that the pictures should be erased except those of Jesus and Mary. 3]
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 552, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 411-412, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Among the poems about the conquest is the following from Hassan b. Thabit: [...]
Gabriel, God's messenger, is with us and
The holy spirit has no equal.
God said, 'I have sent a man
Who speaks the truth if you will profit by experience.
I bear witness to him, so arise confess him truthful.'
But you said, 'We will not and we do not wish to.'
And God said, 'I have sent an army,
The Ansar accustomed to the fray.'
Every day we get from Ma'add
Cursing, battle, or lampooning.
We will repulse with verses those who lampoon us
And smite them when war breaks out.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 558-559, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 421-423, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Bujayr b. Zuhayr b. Abu Sulma said concerning the day of the conquest:
Muzayna and the Banu Khufaf that day
Expelled the people of al-Haballaq' from every ravine.
We smote them with our sharp swords
The day the good prophet entered Mecca.
We came on them with seven hundred from Sulaym
And a full thousand from Banu 'Uthman.
We smote their shoulders with cut and thrust
And shot them with our feathered shafts.
You could hear among the ranks their whisper
As if the notched end were split from its binding.
We went with lances straight levelled
While our horses wheeled among them.
We came back plundering as we would
While they went back discomfited.
We pledged our faith to the apostle
In sincere friendship.
They heard what we said and determined
To depart from us that day of fear.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 560-561, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 425-426, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Khalid's Expedition After the Conquest to The B. Jadhima of Kinana and 'Ali's Expedition to Repair Khalid's Error:
The apostle sent out troops in the district round Mecca inviting men to God: he did not order them to fight. Among those he sent was Khalid b. al-Walid whom he ordered to go to the lower part of the flat country as a missionary; he did not send him to fight. He subdued the B. Jadhima and killed some of them.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 561, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 428, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
One of the B. Jadhima said:
God requite Mudlij for the evil they did us
Wherever they go or rest.
They took our goods and divided them;
The spears came at us not once nor twice.
Were it not for the religion of Muhammad's people
Their cavalry would have fled and been driven off.
What hindered them from helping a squadron
Like a swarm of locusts loose and scattered abroad?
If they repent or return to their (right) way,
We will not repay them for what the squadron lost.

Wahb of the B. Layth answered him:

We called 'Amir to Islam and the truth.
It is not our fault if 'Amir turned their backs.
What happened to 'Amir, confound them, is not our fault
Because their minds were foolish and went astray.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 564, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 434-435, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The apostle turned to Abu Sufyan who was one of those who stood firm with the apostle that day and was an excellent Muslim when he accepted the faith, as he was holding on to the back of the saddle of his mule and asked who it was. He replied, 'I am your mother's son, O apostle of God."
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 570, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 446, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Abbas b. Mirdas al-Sulami, mentioning Qarib b. al-Aswad and his flight from his father's sons, and Dhu'l-Khimar and his shutting up his

people to death, said:

Who will tell Ghaylan and 'Urwa from me
(I think one who knows will come to him).
I send to tell you something
Which is different from what you say which will go round
That Muhammad is a man, an apostle to my Lord
Who errs not, neither does he sin.
We have found him a prophet like Moses,
Any who would rival him in goodness must fail.
Evil was the state of the B. Qasiy in Wajj
When each one's affairs were decreed.
They lost the day (and every people has a ruler
And fortunes change).
We came on them like lions of the thickets,
The armies of God came openly.
We came at the main body of B. Qasiy
Almost flying at them in our rage.
Had they stayed I swear we would have come at them
With armies and they would not have got away.
We were as lions of Liya there until we destroyed them
And al-Nusur were forced to surrender.
There was a day before that day at Hunayn which is past
And blood then flowed freely.
In former days there was no battle like this;
Men of long memories have never heard of such.
We slew B. Hutayt in the dust by their flags
While the cavalry turned away.
Dhu'l-Khimar was not the chief of a people
Who possessed intelligence to blame or disapprove.
He led them on the road to death
As everyone could see.
Those who escaped were choked with terror,
A multitude of them were slain.
The languid man could not help in such a case
Nor he who was too shy and hesitant to attack.
He destroyed them and he perished himself.
They had given him the leadership and the leaders fled.
Banu 'Auf's horses went at a fair pace
Fed on fresh grass and barley.
But for Qarib and his father's sons
The fields and castles would have been divided,
But they attained prominence
By the lucky advice they were given.
They obeyed Qarib and they had good fortune
And good sense that brought them glory.
If they are guided to Islam they will be found
Leaders of men while time lasts.
If they do not accept it they call
For God's war in which they will have no helper.
As war destroyed the B. Sa'd
And fate the clan of B. Ghaziya.
The B. Mu'awiya b. Bakr
Were like a flock of sleep coming bleating to Islam.
We said, 'Be Muslims; we are your brethren,
For our breasts arc free from enmity.'
When the people came to us they seemed
Blind to hatred after peace had come.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 572-574, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 450-452, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Amra d. Durayd said of Rabi'a's killing him:
l' faith I did not fear the army of fate
On Durayd's account in the valley of Sumayra.
God repay the B. Sulaym for him
And may ingratitude rend them for what they have done.
May He give us the blood of their best men to drink
When we lead an army against them.
Many a calamity did you avert from them
When they were at the point of death.
Many a noble woman of theirs did you free
And others you loosed from bonds.
Many a man of Sulaym named you noble
As he died when you had answered his call.
Our reward from them is ingratitude and grief
Which melts our very bones.
May the traces of your cavalry after hard travel
In Dhu Baqar as far as the desert of al-Nuhaq be effaced!
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 574-575, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 453-454, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
One of B. Sad b. Bakr told me that the apostle said that day, 'If you get hold of Bijad, a man of B. Sad b. Bakr, don't let him escape you,' for he had done great wrong. When the Muslims took him they led him away with his family and with him (T. his sister) al-Shayma' d. al-Harith (T. b. Abdullah) b. Abdu'I-'Uzza, foster-sister of the apostle. They treated her roughly as they brought her along and she told the Muslims that she was the foster-sister of the apostle, but they did not believe her until they had brought her to the apostle.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 576, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 458, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Abbas b. Mirdas also said:
O Seal of the Prophets, you are sent with the truth
With all guidance for the way.
God has built up love upon you
In His creation and named you Muhammad.
Then those who were faithful to your agreement with them,
An army over whom you set al-Dahhak,
A man with sharp weapons as though
When the enemy surrounded him he saw you.
He attacked those of (his) kith and kin
Seeking only to please God and you.
I tell you I saw him charging in clouds of dust
Crushing the heads of the polytheists;
Now throttling with bare hands,
Now splitting their skulls with his sharp sword.
The B. Sulaym hastened before him
With continual cuts and thrusts at the enemy.
They walked beneath his banner there
Like lions with a haunt they mean to defend.
They did not hope for consideration of kinship
But obedience to their Lord and your love.
These were our doings for which we are renowned.
And our Helper is your Lord.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 577-578, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 461, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Abbas b. Mirdas also said: [...]
With strong warriors of Sulaym
Who obey his orders to the letter,
Khufaf and Dhakwan and 'Auf whom you would think
Were black stallions walking among the she-camels
As though our reddish-white mail and helmets'
Clothed long-eared lions which meet one another in their lairs.
By us God's religion is undeniably strong.
We added a like number to the clan that was with him.
When we came to Mecca, our banner
Was like an eagle soaring to dart on its prey
(Riding) on horses which gazed upwards.
You would think when they gallop in their bits there is a sound of jinn among them,
The day we trod down the unbelievers
And found no deviation or turning from the apostle's order.
In a battle mid which the people heard only
Our exhortations to fight and the smashing of skulls
By swords that sent heads flying from their base
And severed the necks of warriors at a blow.
Often have we left the slain cut to pieces
And a widow crying Alas! over her husband.
'Tis God not man we seek to please;
To Him belongs the seen and the unseen.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 577-581, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 465-466, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Abbas b. Mirdas also said: [...]
We helped God's apostle, angry on his account,
With a thousand warriors apart from unarmed men,
We carried his flag on the end of our lances,
His helper protecting it in deadly combat.
We dyed it with blood, for that was its colour,
The day of Hunayn when Safwan thrust with his spear.
We were his right wing in Islam,
We had charge of the flag and displayed it
We were his bodyguard before other troops,
He consulted us and we consulted him.
He summoned us and named us intimates first of all
And we helped him against his opponents.
God richly reward that fine prophet Muhammad
And strengthen him with victory, for God is his helper!
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 577-583, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 468-467, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Abbas b. Mirdas also said:
Since you have made Khalid chief of the army
And promoted him he has become a chief indeed
In an army guided by God whose commander you are
By which you smite the wicked with every right.
I swore a true oath to Muhammad
And I fulfilled it with a thousand bridled horses.
The prophet of the believers said, Advance!
And we rejoiced that we were the vanguard.
We passed the night at the pool of Mustadir;
There was no fear in us but desire and preparedness (for war).
We obeyed you till all the enemy surrendered
And until in the morning we overtook the crowd, the people of Yalamlam.
The piebald steed with reddish barrel went astray'
And the chief was not content till it was marked.
We attacked them like a flock of grouse the morning affrights.
Everyone was too concerned to see to his fellow,
From morn till eve till we left Hunayn
With its watercourses streaming with blood.
Wherever you looked you could see a fine mare
And its rider lying beside a broken lance.
Hawazin had recovered their herds from us
And it pleased them that we should be disappointed and deprived (of them).
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 577-584, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 470, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Abu Thawab Zayd b. Suhar, one of B. Sad b. Bakr, said:
Have you not heard that Quraysh conquered Hawazin
(Misfortunes have their causes).
There was a time, Quraysh, when if we were angry
Red blood flowed because of our rage.
There was a time, Quraysh, when if we were angry
It seemed as though snuff were in our nostrils.
And now Quraysh drive us
Like camels urged on by peasants.
I am not in a position to refuse humiliation
Nor am I disposed to give in to them.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 586, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 476, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Ka'b b. Malik when the apostle came to this decision said:
We put an end to doubt in the lowlands and Khaybar,
Then we gave our swords a rest.
We gave them the choice and could they have spoken
Their blades would have said, Give us Daus or Thaqif.
May I be motherless if you do not see
Thousands of us in your courts.
We will tear off the roofs in the valley of Wajj
And we will make your houses desolate.
Our swiftest cavalry will come on you
Leaving behind a tangled mass.
When they come down on your courts
You will hear a cry of alarm
With sharp cutting swords in their hands like flashes of lightning
By which they bring death to those who would fight them
Tempered by Indian smiths--not beaten into plates.
You would think that the flowing blood of the warriors
Was mingled with saffron the morn the forces met.
Good God, had they no adviser
From the peoples who knew about us
To tell them that we had gathered
The finest blood horses and that we had brought an army
To surround the walls of their fort with troops?
Our leader the prophet, firm,
Pure of heart, steadfast, continent,
Straight forward, full of wisdom, knowledge, and clemency;
Not frivolous nor light minded.
We obey our prophet and we obey a Lord
Who is the Compassionate, most kind to us.
If you offer peace we will accept it
And make you partners in peace and war.
If you refuse we will fight you doggedly,
'Twill be no weak faltering affair.
We shall fight as long as we live
Till you turn to Islam, humbly seeking refuge.
We will fight not caring whom we meet
Whether we destroy ancient holdings or newly gotten gains.
How many tribes assembled against us
Their finest stock and allies!
They came at us thinking they had no equal
And we cut off their noses and ears
With our fine polished Indian swords,
Driving them violently before us
To the command of God and Islam,
Until religion is established, just and straight, and
Al-Lat and al-'Uzza and Wudd are forgotten
And We plunder them of their necklaces and earrings.
For they had become established and confident,
And he who cannot protect himself must suffer disgrace.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 587-588, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 478-480, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
When the apostle arrived (at Medina) after his departure from aI-Ta'if Bujayr b. Zuhayr b. Abu Sulma wrote to his brother Ka'b telling him 'that the apostle had killed some of the men in Mecca who had satirized and insulted him and that the Quraysh poets who were left-Ibn aI-Ziba'ra and Hubayra b. Abu Wahb--had fled in all directions. 'If you have any use for your life then come quickly to the apostle, for he does not kill anyone who comes to him in repentance. If you do not do that, then get to some safe place.'
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 597, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 501, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
After he had become a Muslim he spoke in praise of the Ansar and mentioned their trials with the apostle and their position among the Yaman tribes:
He who loves a glorious life
Let him ever be with the horsemen of the righteous Ansar
Who transmit glorious deeds from father to son.
The best men are they, sons of the best men
Who launch with their arms spears
Like long Indian swords,
Who peer forward unweariedly
With eyes red as burning coals.
Who devote their lives to their prophet
On the day of hand-to-hand fighting and cavalry attacks.
They purify themselves with the blood of infidels;
They consider that an act of piety.
Their habit is that of thick-necked lions
Accustomed to hunt in a valleyed thicket.
If you come to them for protection
You are as it were in the inaccessible haunts of mountain goats.
They smote 'Ali such a blow on the day of Badr
As brought the downfall of all Nizar.
If people knew all that I know about them
Those that dispute with me would recognize the truth of what I say.
They are a people who richly feed the night-travellers,
Who arrive in a time of dearth.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 601-602, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 514-515, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
The Raid on Tabuk, A.H. 9
The apostle ordered his companions to prepare to raid the Byzantines at a time when men were hard pressed; the heat was oppressive and there was a drought; fruit was ripe (To and shade was eagerly sought) and the men wanted to stay in the shade with their fruit and disliked travelling at that season.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 602, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 515-516, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Then the apostle summoned Khalid b. al-Walid and sent him to Ukaydir at Duma. Ukaydir b. 'Abdu'l-Malik was a man of Kinda who was ruler of Duma; he was a Christian. The apostle told Khalid that he would find him hunting wild cows. Khalid went off until he came within sight of his fort. It was a summer night with a bright moon and Ukaydir was on the roof with his wife. The cows were rubbing their horns against the gate of the fort all the night. His wife asked him if he had ever known anything of the kind in the past, and urged him to go after them. He called for his horse, and when it was saddled he rode off with a number of his family, among them a brother called Hassan. As they were riding the apostle's cavalry fell in with them and seized him and killed his brother. Ukaydir was wearing a gown of brocade covered with gold. Khalid stripped him of this and sent it to the apostle before he brought him to him.

'Asim b. 'Umar b. Qatada from Anas b. Malik said: I saw Ukaydir's gown when it was brought to the apostle. The Muslims were feeling it and admiring it, and the apostle said, 'Do you admire this? By Him in whose hand is my life the napkins of Sad b. Mu'adh in Paradise are better than this.'

Then Khalid brought Ukaydir to the apostle who spared his life and made peace with him on condition that he paid the poll tax. Then he released him and he returned to his town.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 607-608, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 526, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
'Umayr B. 'Adiy's Journey to Kill 'Asma' D. Marwan:

She was of B. Umayya b. Zayd. When Abu 'Afak had been killed she displayed disaffection. 'Abdullah b. al-Harith b. al-Fudayl from his father said that she was married to a man of B. Khatma called Yazid b. Zayd. Blaming Islam and its followers she said:

I despise B. Malik and al-Nabit
And 'Auf and B. al-Khazraj
You obey a stranger who is none of yours,
One not of Murad or Madhhij.
Do you expect good from him after the killing of your chiefs
Like a hungry man waiting for a cook's broth?
Is there no man of pride who would attack him by surprise
And cut off the hopes of those who expect aught from him?

Hassan b. Thabit answered her:

Banu Wa'il and B. Waqif and Khatma
Are inferior to B. al-Khazraj.
When she called for folly woe to her in her weeping,
For death is coming.
She stirred up a man of glorious origin,
Noble in his going out and his coming in.
Before midnight he dyed her in her blood
And incurred no guilt thereby.
When the apostle heard what she had said he said, 'Who will rid me of Marwan's daughter l' 'Umayr b. 'Adiy al-Khalmi who was with him heard him, and that very night he went to her house and killed her. In the morning he came to the apostle and told him what he had done and he said, 'You have helped God and His apostle, a 'Umayr!' When he asked if he would have to bear any evil consequences the apostle said, 'Two goats won't butt their heads about her,' so 'Umayr went back to his people.
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, pp. 675-676, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 636-637, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 
Hassan b. Thabit answered him:
You brought Kinana in your folly (to fight) the apostle,
For God's army was (bound to) disgrace them.
You brought them to death's cisterns in broad daylight.
Hell was their meeting-place, killing what they met with.
You collected them, black slaves, men of no descent,
O leaders of infidels whom their insolent ones deceived.
Why did you not learn from those thrown into Badr's pit
Slain by God's horsemen?
Many a prisoner did we free without ransom,
Many a captive's forelock did we, his masters, cut!
Ibn Ishaq (d. 768); Ibn Hisham (d. 833), A. Guillaume, ed, The Life of Muhammad [Sirat Rasul Allah], Oxford UP, p. 405, ISBN 0-19-636033-1, 1955, https://archive.org/details/GuillaumeATheLifeOfMuhammad/page/n1/mode/2up 
ابن إسحاق; ابن هشام, سيرة ابن هشام ت السقا, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 131-132, https://app.turath.io/book/23833 

Al Tabari

Hamzah persevered in his Islam. Quraysh recognized that by Hamzah's acceptance of Islam the Messenger of God had been strengthened and that Hamzah would protect him; after this, they curbed some of their attacks on him.
al-Tabari (d. 923), M. V. McDonald; W. Montgomery Watt, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VI, SUNY Press, p. 104, ISBN 0-88706-706-9, 1988, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1577/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 334, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Umar b. al-Khattab, who was a staunch, sturdy, and mighty warrior, had accepted Islam, as had Hamzah b. 'Abd al-Muttalib before him, and the Messenger of God's Companions began to feel stronger.
al-Tabari (d. 923), M. V. McDonald; W. Montgomery Watt, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VI, SUNY Press, p. 105, ISBN 0-88706-706-9, 1988, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1577/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 335, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Abu Ja'far (al-Tabari): After God had given his Messenger permission to fight by revealing the verse:' "And fight them until persecution is no more, and religion is all for God," and the Ansar had pledged themselves to support him according to the terms which I have described, the Messenger of God commanded those of his Companions from among the Muslims who were with him at Mecca to emigrate, go to al-Madinah, and join their brethren, the Ansar
al-Tabari (d. 923), M. V. McDonald; W. Montgomery Watt, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VI, SUNY Press, p. 139, ISBN 0-88706-706-9, 1988, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1577/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 368-369, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
They hesitated and were afraid to advance upon them, but then they plucked up courage and agreed to kill as many of them as they could and to seize what they had with them. Wagid b. 'Abd Allah al-Tamimi shot an arrow at 'Amr b. al-Hadrami and killed him, and 'Uthman b. 'Abd Allah and al-Hakam b. Kaysan surrendered, but Nawfal b. 'Abd Allah escaped and they were unable to catch him. Then 'Abd Allah b. Jahsh and his companions took the caravan and the two captives back to the Messenger of God in Medina.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 19, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 412, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Abu Ja'far (al-Tabari) says: The Messenger of God remained in Medina after his return from Badr. When he first came to Medina he had made a compact with its Jews that they would not aid anyone against him and that if any enemy attacked him there they would come to his aid. After the Messenger of God killed many polytheists of Quraysh at Badr, (the Jews) were envious and behaved badly towards him, saying, "Muhammad has not met anyone who is good at fighting. Had he met us, he would have had a battle which would be unlike a battle with anyone else." They also infringed the contract in various ways.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 85, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 479, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Al-Zuhri-'Urwah: Gabriel brought the following verse down to the Messenger of God : "And if thou fearest treachery from any folk, then throw back to them their treaty fairly." When Gabriel had finished delivering this verse, the Messenger of God said, "I fear the Banu Qaynuqa'."
'Urwah says: It was on the basis of this verse that the Messenger of God advanced upon them.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 85, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 480, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
We lifted him up and carried him to the Messenger of God at the end of the night. He was standing in prayer, so we greeted him, and he came out to meet us. We told him that the enemy of God had been killed, he spat upon the wound of our companion, and we returned to our families. The next morning, the Jews were in a state of fear on account of our attack upon the enemy of God, and there was not a Jew there but feared for his life.
The Messenger of God said, "Whoever of the Jews falls into your hands, kill him." So Muhayyisah b. Masud fell upon Ibn Sunaynah, one of the Jewish merchants who was on close terms with them and used to trade with them, and killed him. Huwayyisah b. Mas'ud (his brother) at that time had not accepted Islam; he was older than Muhayyisah, and when (the latter) killed (the Jew), he began beating him and saying, "O enemy of God, have you killed him? By God, you have much fat in your belly from his wealth." Muhayyisah said, "I said to him, 'By God, if he who commanded me to kill him had commanded me to kill you, I would have cut off your head." And, by God, that was the beginning of Huwayyisah's acceptance of Islam. He said, "If Muhammad had ordered you to kill me, you would have killed me?" and I replied, "Yes, by God, if he had ordered me to kill you I would have cut off your head." "By God," he said, "a faith which has brought you to this is indeed a marvel." Then Huwayyisah accepted Islam.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, pp. 97-98, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 491, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
The Killing of Abu Rafi' the Jew:

Abu Ja'far (al-Tabari) says: In this year, it is said, the killing of Abu Rafi' the Jew took place. The reason for his being killed was, it is said, that he used to take the part of Ka'b b. al-Ashraf against the Messenger of God. The Messenger of God is said to have sent 'Abd Allah b.'Atik against him in the middle of Jumada al-Akhirah of this year (which began November i 9, 624).

According to Harun b. Ishaq al-Hamdani--Mus'ab b. Miqdam--Isra'il--Abu Ishaq--al-Bard': The Messenger of God sent some of the Ansar under the command of 'Abd Allah b. 'Uqbah or 'Abd Allah b. 'Atik against Abu Rafi' the Jew, who was in the Hijaz. Abu Rafi' used to injure and wrong the Messenger of God. He lived in his stronghold in the Hijaz. When the Muslim party drew close to it, as the sun was setting and the people were bringing their flocks back, 'Abd Allah b. 'Uqbah or 'Abd Allah b. 'Atik said to the others, "Stay where you are, and I will go and ingratiate myself with the doorkeeper, in the hope of gaining entrance." He went forward, and when he was close to the door, he wrapped himself up in his cloak as though he were relieving himself. Everybody else had gone in, and the doorkeeper called to him, "You there, if you want to come in, come in, because I want to shut the door." "I went in," he said, "and hid myself in a donkey pen. When everybody had come in, the man shut the door and hung up the keys on a wooden peg. I went to the keys, took them, and opened the door. Abu Rafi' had company that evening in some upper rooms, and when his guests left I went up to him. Every time I opened a door, I shut it again behind me from inside, saying to myself, 'If they become aware of me, they will not be able to reach me before I kill him.' When I reached him, he was in a dark room along with his family. As I did not know where he was in the room, I said, 'Abu Rafi'!' and he said, 'Who is that?' I rushed toward the sound and gave him a blow with my sword, but I was in a state of confusion and did not achieve anything. He gave a shout, and I left the room but remained close at hand. I then went in again and said, 'What was that noise, Abu Rafi'?' 'God damn it,' he said, 'there is a man in the house who has just struck me with his sword.' Then I hit him and covered him with wounds, but I could not kill him, so I thrust the point of my sword into his stomach until it came out through his back. At that, I knew that I had killed him, and I opened the doors one by one until I reached a flight of stairs. Thinking that I had reached the ground, I put my foot out but fell into a moonlit night and broke my leg. I bound it up with my turban and moved on. Finally, finding myself sitting by the door, I said to myself, 'By God, I will not leave tonight until I know whether I have killed him or not.' When the cock crowed, the announcer of his death stood upon the wall and said, 'I announce the death of Abu Rafi', the profit-maker of the people of Hijaz.' I went to my companions and said , 'Deliverance! God has killed Abu Rafi'.' Then I went to the Prophet and told him, and he said, 'Stretch out your leg!' When I stretched it out, he stroked it, and it was as though I had never had anything wrong with it."
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, pp. 99-101, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 493-495, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
When al-Khazraj did something, al-Aws said the same. Thus, when al-Aws killed Ka'b b. al-Ashraf on account of his hostility to the Messenger of God, al-Khazraj said, "They will never take superiority from us by doing that." They conferred together to find a man comparable to Ibn al -Ashraf in hostility to the Messenger of God and called to mind Ibn Abi al-Huqayq, who was in Khaybar. They then asked the Messenger of God for permission to kill him, and this he gave. Five men of al-Khazraj, of the clan of Banu Salimah, set out, 'Abd Allah b.'Atik, Masud b. Sinan, 'Abd Allah b. Unays, Abu Qatadah al-Harith b. Rib'i, and Khuza'i b. al-Aswad, a confederate of theirs from (the tribe of) Aslam. The Messenger of God put 'Abd Allah b. 'Atik in command of them and forbade them to kill women or children. Setting out, they reached Khaybar and entered Ibn Abi al-Huqayq's house by night. As they went, they shut the door of every room in the house upon its occupants. Ibn Abi al-Huqayq was in an upper room reached by a spiral stairway. They climbed up this, went to the door, and asked permission to enter. A woman came out to them and said, "Who are you?" They replied, "We are some bedouin seeking provisions of grain." She said, "The man you want is over there; go in and see him." "When we went in," (they said), "we shut the door behind her, ourselves, and him, being afraid that a patrol might prevent us from getting at him. His wife gave a shout to warn him of our presence, and we rushed upon him with our swords as he was in his bed. By God, the only thing which guided us to him in the blackness of the night was his whiteness, as though he were a piece of Egyptian linen thrown down there.

"When his wife shouted that we were there, one of us would raise his sword against her; then he would remember the Prophet's prohibition and withdraw his hand. If it had not been for that, we would have dispatched him that night. After we had struck him with our swords, 'Abd Allah b. Unays thrust his sword into his stomach and transfixed him while he was shouting, 'Enough! Enough!' At once we went out. 'Abd Allah b. 'Atik had bad eyesight, and he fell off the stairway, bruising his leg severely. We lifted him up, took him to one of their water channels, and entered it. They lit lamps, and searched for us in every nook and cranny, but finally they gave up hope and went back to their master, crowding round him as he lay dying. We said to ourselves, 'How shall we know that the enemy of God is dead?' One of us said, 'I will go and look for you.' He set off and mingled with the people. He said later, 'I found him with the men of the Jews, and with his wife, who had a lamp in her hand and was looking into his face. Then she said, speaking to them, "By God, I recognised the voice of Ibn 'Atik, but then I thought I must be wrong, and said to myself, 'How could Ibn 'Atik be in this country?"' Then she turned to him to look in his face, and said, "By the God of the Jews, he is dead ." 'I never heard any words more pleasing to me, said our companion.

"He then came back to us and told us the news. We lifted up our injured companion, went to the Messenger of God, and told him that we had killed the enemy of God. We disagreed in his presence about the killing of Ibn Abi al-Huqayq, each of us claiming to have done it. The Messenger of God then said, 'Bring your swords,' and when we did so he looked at them and said, 'This sword of 'Abd Allah b. Unays killed him. I can see the marks left by bones on it.'"
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, pp. 101-103, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 495-497, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
The Messenger of God then called for his coat of mail and put it on. When they saw him armed, the people repented and said, "What an evil deed we have done, giving the Messenger of God advice when inspiration comes to him!" They rose up and apologised to him, saying, "Do what you see fit! " The Messenger of God replied, "It is not fitting for a prophet to put on his coat of mail and take it off again before fighting." So the Messenger of God went out to Uhud at the head of a thousand men, having promised them victory if they showed endurance.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 109, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 503-504, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:372
When the latter [a blind Jew] became aware of the presence of the Messenger of God and the Muslims with him, he rose up and threw dust in their faces, saying, "Even if you are the Messenger of God, I will not allow you into my garden !" I was told that he took a handful of dust and then said: "If only I knew that I would not hit anyone else, Muhammad, I would throw it in your face." The people rushed up to kill him, but the Messenger of God said, "Do not do so, for this man who is blind of sight is also blind of heart." Sa'd b. Yazid, the brother of the Banu 'Abd al-Ashhal, had rushed up to al-Mirba' as the Messenger of God uttered this prohibition, and he split al-Mirba"s head open with his bow.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 112, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 506-507, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:372
Abu Ja'far (al-Tabari) says: When the enemy overwhelmed him, the Messenger of God said, "Who will sell his life for us?"
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 120, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 515, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Wahshi, the slave of Jubayr b. Mut'im, said, "By God, I saw Hamzah cutting down men with his sword, not sparing anyone who went past him; he was like an ash-colored camel (in size). When Siba' b. `Abd al-'Uzza reached him before me, Hamzah said to him, 'Come over here, you son of a cutter-off of clitorises.' He then struck him so swiftly that he could not be seen striking his head. I balanced my javelin until I was satisfied with it, and then I hurled it at Hamzah. It struck him in the lower part of the belly with such force that it came out between his legs. He came towards me, but was overcome and fell. I waited until he was dead and then went and recovered my javelin; after that I returned to the camp, since there was nothing else I wanted to do there."
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, pp. 121-122, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 517, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--Salih b. Kaysan--somebody who told him from Said b. Abi Waqqas: Said used to say, "By God, I never thirsted to kill anyone as I thirsted to kill 'Utbah b. Abi Waggas. Even if I had not known that he was evil of character and hated among his own people, the Messenger of God's saying, 'May God's anger be intense against those who have bloodied the face of the Messenger of God,' would have been enough for me."
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 124, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 519, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Abu Ja'far (al-Tabari) says: Hanzalah b. Abi'Amir, he whom the angels cleansed, met Abu Sufyan b. Harb in battle . He had gained the better of Abu Sufyan when Shaddad b. al-Aswad, who was known as Ibn Sha'ub, seeing him poised over Abu Sufyan, struck and killed him. The Messenger of God said, "Your companion (meaning Hanzalah ) is being cleansed by the angels. Ask his family what this is about." When they asked his wife, she replied, "He went out to battle in a state of ritual impurity when he heard the call to battle." The Messenger of God said, "That is why the angels were cleansing him."
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 127, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 521, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Replying to Abu Sufyan's words, "My colt kept a short distance from them," al-Harith b. Hisham, who thought he was alluding to him as he had fled from Badr, said:
If you had seen what they did at the pool of Badr,
You would have gone back with a heart which would be terror-struck as long as you lived.
Or mourning-women would have risen up to bewail you,
and you would not care about the loss of a loved one.
I requited them later for Badr with its like,
mounted on a swift, smoothly-moving, galloping horse.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 129, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 524, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Ibn Humayd-Salamah-Ibn Ishaq-Muhammad b. Ja'far b. al-Zubayr: When the Messenger of God saw Hamzah in that condition, he said, "If it were not that Safiyyah would grieve, or that it would become a sunnah (standard practice) after me, I would leave him so that he would find his way into the bellies of wild beasts or the crops of birds. If God gives me victory over Quraysh at any time, I shall mutilate thirty of their men!" When the Muslims saw the grief and rage of the Messenger of God at what had been done to his uncle, they said, "By God, if one day we are victorious over them, we shall mutilate them in a way which none of the Arabs has ever mutilated an
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 133, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 528-529, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--`Asim b. `Umar b. Qatadah: There was among us a stranger, whose origins were unknown, called Quzman. When anybody mentioned his name, the Messenger of God used to say, "He is one of the people of Hell-fire." On the day of Uhud he fought hard, and killed eight or nine polytheists with his own hand, being bold, brave, and redoubtable. Finally he was disabled by his wounds and was carried to the settlement of the Banu Zafar. Some Muslims began to say, "You have fought valiantly today, Quzman, so rejoice!" "What have I to rejoice about?" he answered. "By God, I only fought for the honour of my people; but for that, I would not have fought." When the pain of his wounds became too severe, he took an arrow from his quiver, slit his wrists, and bled to death. The Messenger of God was told of this, and said, "I testify that I am truly the Messenger of God."
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, pp. 135-136, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 531, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:383
The Expedition of Hamra' al-Asad:
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--Husayn b. 'Abd Allah--'Ikrimah: The day of Uhud was on Saturday, halfway through Shawwal. On the following day, which was Sunday, 16 Shawwal (March 24, 625), the Messenger of God's crier called out to the people to go in pursuit of the enemy, but added that nobody was to join the force except those who had been present at the battle the day before. Jabir b. 'Abd Allah b. 'Amr b. Haram spoke to him and said, "O Messenger of God, my father left me behind to look after my seven sisters and said to me, 'My son, it is not right for me and you to leave these women without a man among them, and I am not one to give you the precedence over myself in fighting along with the Messenger of God; you must stay behind to look after your sisters.' So I stayed behind to look after them." The Messenger of God gave him permission, and he went out with him. The Messenger of God's only purpose in this expedition was to lower the morale of the enemy; by going out in pursuit of them, he wanted to give them the impression that his strength was unimpaired, and that the Muslims' casualties had not weakened their ability to engage in fighting.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, pp. 138-139, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 534, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:389
The (Muslims) who had bivouacked for the night were taken completely by surprise by men with swords in their hands; they took up their swords to fight them, but the (men) said, "By God, we do not want to kill you. We only want to get some (money) for you from the people of Mecca. We swear to you by God's covenant that we will not kill you." Marthad b. Abi Marthad, Khalid b. Bukayr, and 'Asim b. Thabit b. Abi al-Aglah said, "By God, we will never accept a compact or contract from a polytheist," and then fought until they were all killed. Zayd b. al-Dathinnah, Khubayb b. 'Adi, and 'Abd Allah b. Tariq, however, were soft and yielding, desiring life, and surrendered; they were made prisoners and taken to Mecca to be sold there.
When they got as far as al-Zahran, 'Abd Allah b. Tariq broke loose from his bonds, and seized his sword. His captors kept well back from him, but threw stones at him until they had killed him. They buried him at al-Zahran. As for Khubayb b. 'Adi and Zayd b. al-Dathinnah, their captors took them to Mecca and sold them there. Khubayb was bought by Hujayr b. Abi Ihab al-Tamimi, the confederate of the Banu Nawfal, on behalf of 'Uqbah b. al-Harith b. 'Amir b. Nawfal, Hujayr being the brother of al-Harith b. 'Amir by his mother; this was so that 'Uqbah might kill him in revenge for his father. Zayd b. al-Dathinnah was bought by Safwan b. Umayyah in order to kill him in revenge for his father, Umayyah b. Khalaf
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 144, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 538-539, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:426
The Mission of 'Amr b. Umayyah against Abu Sufyan:

The story of 'Amr b. Umayyah al-Damn, when he was sent by the Messenger of God to kill Abu Sufyan b. Harb.
When the men whom the Prophet had sent to 'Adal and al-Qarah were killed at al-Raji' and the news reached the Messenger of God, he sent 'Amr b. Umayyah al-Damn and one of the Ansar to Mecca, ordering them to kill Abu Sufyan b. Harb.
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah b. al-Fadl--Muhammad b. Ishaq--Ja'far b. al-Fadl b. al-Hasan b. 'Amr b. Umayyah al-Damri--his father--his great-grandfather, that is 'Amr b. Umayyah, whose account is as follows: After the death of Khubayb and his companions, the Messenger of God sent me together with one of the Ansar, saying, "Go to Abu Sufyan b. Harb and kill him." I and my companion set out. I had a camel and he had not, and he had a weakness in his foot, so I carried him on my camel until we reached the valley of Ya'jaj. Then we hobbled our camel in the bottom of a ravine and climbed up. I said to my companion, "Come with me to Abu Sufyan's house, as I am going to try to kill him. You keep watch, and if a patrol comes or something alarms you, get back to your camel, mount it, return to Medina, and go to the Messenger of God and tell him what has happened. You can leave me to my own devices, because I know the town well, am bold, and have strong legs."
When we entered Mecca I had with me the like of an eagle's secondary feather-meaning his dagger-which I had ready to kill anybody who laid hold of me. My companion said to me, "Shall we make a start by circumambulating the Ka'bah seven times and praying two rak'ahs?" I said to him, "I know the people of Mecca better than you do. When it gets dark, they sprinkle their courtyards with water and sit in them; and I am better known there than a piebald horse."
But he kept on pestering me until in the end we went to the Ka'bah, circumambulated it seven times, and prayed two rak'ahs. When we came out we went past a group of men sitting together, and one of them recognized me and shouted out at the top of his voice, "That is 'Amr b. Umayyah!" The Meccans rushed after us, saying "By God, 'Amr b. Umayyah has not come here for any good purpose! By the God by whom we swear, he has never come here except for some evil purpose!' ('Amr had been a cutthroat and a desperado before accepting Islam).
They set out in pursuit of my companion and myself, and I said to him, "Let us get out of here! This is just what I was afraid of! We will never reach Abu Sufyan now, so save your own skin." We left at full speed, took to the hills, and hid in a cave, where we spent the night. In this way we gave them the slip, and they had to return without us. As we went into the cave, I concealed the entrance with stones, saying to my companion, "Let us wait here until the hue and cry has died down; they are sure to hunt for us the rest of the night and all tomorrow until the evening." I was still in the cave when, by God, 'Uthman b. Malik b. 'Ubayd Allah al-Taymi came up riding proudly on his horse. He kept coming nearer and nearer, riding proudly on his horse, until he reached the entrance to our cave. I said to my companion, "This is Ibn Malik. By God, if he sees us, he will tell everyone in Mecca about us!" So I went out and stabbed him below the breast with my dagger. He gave a shout which all the Meccans heard, and they came up to him while I went back to my hiding place, went in and said to my companion, "Stay where you are!" The Meccans hastily followed the shout, and found him on the point of death. They asked him, who had wounded him. "'Amr b. Umayyah," he replied, and died. They could not find anything to show them where we were, and merely said, "By God, we knew that he came for no good purpose." The death of their companion impeded their search for us, for they carried him away. We remained in the cave for two days until the pursuit had died down and then went out to al-Tan'im, where Khubayb's cross was. My companion said to me, "Shall we take Khubayb down from his cross?" "Where is he?" I said. "You can see him over there," he said. "Very well," I said, "but leave it to me, and keep well away from me." The cross was watched over by a guard, so I said to the Ansari, "If you are afraid of anything, make your way to your camel, mount it, go to the Messenger of God, and tell him what has happened." I went quickly to Khubayb's cross, untied him, and carried him on my back, but I had gone no more than forty paces when they spotted me. At once I threw him down, and I will never forget the sound his body made when it fell. They ran after me, and I took the path to al-Safra' and managed to throw them off. They went back, while my companion made his way to his camel, mounted it, went to the Prophet and told him what had happened to us. I proceeded on foot until I was overlooking Ghalil Dajnan. There I went into a cave with my bow and arrows. While I was in it a tall one-eyed man from the Banu al-Dil b. Bakr came in driving some sheep. He said, "Who is there?" and I said, "One of the Banu Bakr. "Z" He said, "I am from the Banu Bakr, one of the Banu al-Dil." Then he lay down next to me, and raised his voice in song:

I will not be a Muslim as long as I live,
and will not believe in the faith of the Muslims.

I said, "You will soon see!" Before long the beduin went to sleep and started snoring, and I went to him and killed him in the most dreadful way that anybody has ever killed anybody. I leant over him, stuck the end of my bow into his good eye, and thrust it down until it came out of the back of his neck. After that I rushed out like a wild beast and took to the highway like an eagle, fleeing for my life. First, I came to such and such a village, then to Rakubah, and then to al-Nagi'. At this place there were two Meccans whom Quraysh had sent to spy out how things were with the Messenger of God. I recognized them and called on them to surrender. "Shall we surrender to you?" they said; so I shot an arrow at one of them and killed him, and then called on the other to surrender. He did so and I tied him up and took him to the Messenger of God.

According to Ibn Humayd-Salamah-Ibn Islhaq-Sulayman b. Wardan-his father-'Amr b. Umayyah: When I came to Medina, I went past some shaykhs of the Ansar. "By God," they said, "that is 'Amr b. Umayyah!" Some boys heard what they were saying and rushed to the Messenger of God to tell him. I had tied my prisoner's thumbs together with my bowstring, and the Messenger of God looked at him and laughed so that his back teeth could be seen. Then he questioned me and I told him what had happened. "Well done!" he said, and prayed for me to be blessed.
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, pp. 147-150, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 542-545, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
'Abd Allah b. Ubayy sent a message to the Banu al-Nadir saying, "Do not go. I have two thousand men from the beduin and those of my own people who are united around me. Stay, and they will enter battle with you, as will Qurayzah." Ka'b b. Asad, however, the guarantor of the Banu Qurayzah's compact with the Messenger of God, heard of this and said, "No man of the Banu Qurayzah shall break his compact as long as I am alive." Sallam b. Mishkam said to Huyayy b. Akhtab, "Huyayy, we (our tribe) are eminent among our people (the Jews) by virtue of our wealth; accept what Muhammad has proposed before you have to accept what is worse than that." "What is worse than that?" he asked. "The seizure of our wealth, the enslavement of our children, and the killing of our fighting men," he replied. Huyayy refused to accept his advice, however, and sent Judayy b. Akhtab to the Messenger of God to say, "We will not leave our settlements; so do what you see fit."

The Messenger of God magnified God and the Muslims magnified God with him. Then he said, "The Jews have declared war." Judayy then went to In Ubayy to ask for support from him. He said, "I found him sitting among a number of his companions while the Prophet's crier was calling men to arms. His son, 'Abd Allah b. 'Abd Allah b. Ubayy, came in as I was with him, took up his arms, and ran out. I despaired of Ibn Ubayy's help, and told Huyayy of all this. He said, "This is a clever trick of Muhammad's." The Messenger of God marched against the Banu al-Nadir, and besieged them for fifteen days. In the end they made peace with him on the condition that the Messenger of God would not shed their blood and that their property and their coats of mail would be his.
According to Muhammad b. Sa'd-his father-his paternal uncle-his father-his father-Ibn 'Abbas: The Messenger of God besieged them (the Banu al-Nadir) for fifteen days until he had reduced them to a state of utter exhaustion, so that they gave him what he wanted from them and made peace with him. The terms were that he would not shed their blood, would expel them from their lands and their settlements, and would send them to Adhri'at in Syria, providing for every three of them a camel and a water-skin.

According to Ibn 'Abd al-All--Muhammad b. Thawr--Ma'mar--al-Zuhri: The Prophet fought them until he made peace with them on condition that they evacuated Medina. He expelled them to Syria but allowed them to keep what their camels could carry, except for their coats of mail ("coats of mail" means weapons).
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, pp. 158-159, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 553-554, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
There is a difference of opinion as to which of his expeditions took place after that against the Banu al-Nadir.

According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq: The Messenger of God remained in Medina after the expedition against the Banu al-Nadir for the two months of Rabi' and part of the month of Jumada (from August 11 to late October, 625). Then he went on an expedition into Najd, directed against the Banu Muharib and the Banu Tha'labah, part of Ghatafan, and reached Nakhl. This was the expedition of Dhat al-Riqa'. They met there a number of Ghatafan; the armies approached one another, but no fighting took place, because they feared one another. The Messenger of God then led the Muslims in the Prayer of Fear, and left with them.

As for al-Wagidi, he asserts that the Messenger of God's expedition to Dhat al-Riqa' was in Muharram in Year Five of the Hijrah (which began July 2, 626). He says that it was called Dhat al-Riqa' because the mountain after which it was named, Dhat al-Riqa' (the patchwork mountain) had black, white, and red patches on it. The Messenger of God left 'Uthman b. 'Affan in charge of Medina during this expedition
al-Tabari (d. 923), W. Montgomery Watt; M. V. McDonald, eds, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VII, SUNY Press, p. 161, ISBN 0-88706-344-6, 1987, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n1805/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 555-556, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Salman climbed out and went to the Messenger of God, who was pitching a Turkish-style round tent nearby, and said: "O Messenger of God, who are as dear to us as father and mother, a white rock came out of the trench, a flint that broke our iron implements and exhausted us, so that we can make no impression small or great on it. Give us your order concerning it, for we do not wish to deviate from your plan." The Messenger of God went down into the trench with Salman, and we nine climbed up onto its side. The Messenger of God took the pickaxe from Salman and struck the rock a blow that cracked it, and a flash of lightning shot out, illuminating everything between the two tracts of black stones-that is, Medina 's two tracts of black stones-like a lamp inside a dark room. The Messenger of God shouted, "God is greatest! "-a shout of victory-and the Muslims, too, shouted, "God is greatest!" Then the Messenger of God struck it again and cracked it, and a flash of lightning shot out, illuminating everything between Medina's two tracts of black stones-like a lamp inside a dark room. The Messenger of God shouted, "God is greatest!"-a shout of victory-and the Muslims, too, shouted, "God is greatest!" Then the Messenger of God struck it a third time and broke it, and a flash of lightning shot out, illuminating everything between Medina's two tracts of black stones-like a lamp inside a dark room. The Messenger of God shouted, "God is greatest!"-a shout of victory-and the Muslims, too, shouted, "God is greatest!" Then he took Salman's hand and climbed out. Salman said: "You are as dear to me as father and mother, Messenger of God! I have seen something I never saw before." The Messenger of God turned to the men and asked, "Did you see what Salman says?" They said: "Yes, Messenger of God, you who are as dear to us as father and mother; we saw you strike and lightning come out like waves. We saw you shout 'God is greatest,' and so we shouted 'God is greatest.' We saw nothing else." "You have spoken truly," he said. "I struck my first blow, and what you saw flashed out, so that the palaces of al-Hirah and al-Mada'in of Kiss lit up for me from it as if they were dogs' teeth, and Gabriel informed me that my nation would be victorious over them. Then I struck my second blow, and what you saw flashed out, so that the palaces of the pale men in the land of the Byzantine lit up for me from it as if they were dogs' teeth, and Gabriel informed me that my nation would be victorious over them. Then I struck my third blow, and what you saw flashed out, so that the palaces of San'a' lit up for me from it as if they were dogs ' teeth, and Gabriel informed me that my nation would be victorious over them, [saying]: "Rejoice; victory shall come to them! Rejoice; victory shall come to them! Rejoice; victory shall come to them!" So the Muslims rejoiced and said: "Praise be to God! The promise of One who is true and faithful! He has promised us victory after tribulation." So when the allied clans came up, the believers said: "This is what God and His Messenger promised us. God and His Messenger have spoken truly." And it only increased them in faith and surrender. But the hypocrites said: "Do you not wonder? He discourses to you, raises your hopes, and promises you false things. He tells you that from Yathrib he can see the palaces of al-Hirah and al-Mada'in of Kisra and that they will be conquered by you-and this while you are digging the trench and cannot go forth!" So the following [verse of the] Qur'an was revealed: "And when the hypocrites and those in whose hearts is sickness were saying, 'God and His Messenger promised us naught but delusion.'"
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 11-13, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 568-570, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:451
The Messenger of God and the polytheists stayed in their positions for over twenty nights-nearly a month-with no warfare between the troops, except for the shooting of arrows and the siege.
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--'Agim b. 'Umar b. Qatadah and Muhammad b. Muslim b. Shihab al-Zuhri: When the trial became great for the people, the Messenger of God sent to 'Uyaynah b. Hisn and al-Harith b. 'Awf b. Abi Harithah al-Murri, the two leaders of Ghatafan, and offered them a third of the date harvest of Medina on condition that they and their followers go back, leaving the Messenger of God and his companions. The truce between the two sides progressed to the point of drawing up a written document, but there was no witnessing or firm determination to make peace; it was only a matter of maneuvering. So the two of them acted as they did. When the Messenger of God was about to act, he sent to Sa'd b. Mu'adh and Sa'd b. 'Ubadah, gave them an account, and asked their advice. The two said, "Messenger of God, is it something you would like us to do, or is it something God has commanded you to do that we must do, or is it something you are doing for us?" He answered: "Indeed, it is for you. By God, I am doing it only because I saw that the Arabs had shot at you from a single bow and had dogged you from every side; so I wanted somehow to avert their furor from you for a time." Sad b. Mu'adh said: "Messenger of God, we and these people used to be polytheists, associating [other divinities] with God and worshiping idols, and we neither worshiped God nor knew him; and they did not hope to eat a single date of ours except in hospitality or by buying. Now that God has conferred Islam on us, guided us to it, and strengthened us with your presence, shall we give them our wealth? We have no need for this! By God, we will offer them only the sword, until God judge between us and them." "As you wish," said the Messenger of God. So Sa'd took the sheet and erased the writing on it. Then he said, "Let them do their utmost against us."
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 17-18, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 572-573, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Safiyyah, who said: Hassan was with us there with the women and children. A man from the Jews passed by us and began to circle the fortress. The Banu Qurayzah had gone to war and had broken their pact with the Messenger of God. There was no one between us and them to defend us-the Messenger of God and the Muslims, being face to face with the enemy, could not leave them to come back to us when anyone came at us. So I said: "Hassan, this Jew, as you see, is circling the fortress. By God, I fear he will point out our exposed places to the Jews who are to our rear while the Messenger of God and his companions are too busy to attend to us. So go down to him and kill him." He replied: "God forgive you, daughter of 'Abd al-Muttalib! You know I am not the man to do it." When he said that to me and I saw that nothing could be expected from him, I girded myself, took a club, and, having gone down from the fortress to the man, I struck him with the club until I killed him. When I had finished with him, I returned to the fortress and said: "Hassan, go down to him and strip him"-only his being a man kept me from stripping him. Hassan replied, "I have no need for his spoils, daughter of 'Abd al-Muttalib."
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 22-23, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 577, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:458
The Messenger of God had commanded that all of them who had reached puberty should be killed.

According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--Ayyub b. 'Abd al-Rahman b. 'Abdallah b. Abi Sa'Sa'ah (a member of the Banu 'Adi b. al-Najjar): Salma bt. Qays, the mother of al-Mundhir and sister of Salit b. Qays, was one of the maternal aunts of the Messenger of God. She had prayed with him facing both of the qiblahs and had sworn allegiance to him after the manner of women. She asked him for [the life of] Rifa'ah b. Shamwil al-Qurazi, who had come of age. He had taken refuge with her and had previously been one of their acquaintances. She said: "Prophet of God, you are as dear to me as my father and mother! Give me Rifa'ah b. Shamwil, for he has said that he will pray and eat camel meat. He gave him to her, and thus she saved his life.

According to Ibn Ishaq: Then the Messenger of God divided the wealth, wives, and children of the Banu Qurayzah among the Muslims. On that day he made known the shares of horsemen and shares of foot soldiers, and he deducted from these shares the fifth (khums). A horseman received three shares: two shares for the horse and one share for its rider. A foot soldier who had no horse received one share. The cavalry at the battle with the Banu Qurayzah numbered thirty-six horses. It was the first booty (fay') in which shares were allotted and from which the khums was deducted; and according to its precedent (sunnah) and the procedure of the Messenger of God in it divisions of booty took place and precedent was followed in [succeeding] expeditions. However, if a man had horses with him, he appointed shares only for two horses
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 38-39, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 591, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Ibn Ishaq, the conquest of the Banu Qurayzah took place in the month of Dhu al-Qa'dah or in the beginning of Dhu al-Hijjah. Al-Waqidi, however, has said that the Messenger of God attacked them a few days before the end of Dhu al-Qa'dah. He asserted that the Messenger of God commanded that furrows should be dug in the ground for the Banu Qurayzah. Then he sat down, and 'Ali and al-Zubayr began cutting off their heads in his presence. He asserts that the woman whom the Prophet killed that day was named Bunanah, the wife of al-Hakam al-Qurazi-it was she who had .killed Khallad b. Suwayd by throwing a millstone on him. The Messenger of God called for her and beheaded her in retaliation for Khallad b. Suwayd.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 40-41, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 593, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
They went back, and I did not leave my place until I saw the horsemen of the Messenger of God coming through the trees. The first of them was al-Akhram al-Asadi) following him came Abu Qatadah al-Ansari, and after him was al-Migdad b. al-Aswad al-Kindi. I took hold of the rein of al-Akhram's horse and said: "Akhram, the men are few. Be on guard against them) don't let them cut you off before the Messenger of God reaches us with his companions." Al-Akhram said, "Salamah, if you believe in God and the Last Day and know that Paradise is real and that the Fire is real, do not stand between me and martyrdom!"

I let him go. He and 'Abd al-Rahman b. 'Uyaynah met. Al-Akhram hamstrung 'Abd al-Rahman's horse, but 'Abd al-Rahman thrust at him with a spear and killed him. 'Abd al-Rahman then shifted onto his horse. Abu Qatadah overtook 'Abd al-Rahman and thrust at him and killed him. 'Abd al-Rahman had hamstrung Abu Qatadah's horse, so Abu Qatadah shifted onto al-Akhram's horse. They left in flight.
According to Salamah: By Him who honored Muhammad, I followed them, running on foot until I could not see any of Muhammad's companions behind me, or even their dust. Before sunset they turned aside into a canyon called Dhu Qarad where there was water to drink, for they were thirsty. They saw me running after them, and I drove them away so that they tasted not a drop of it. Then they went up into the mountain trail of Dhu Athir. One of them turned back to attack me, and I shot him with an arrow that landed in his shoulder blade. I said, "Take that!":

I am Ibn al-Akwa'!
Today is the day for the mean [to receive destruction]
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 45-46, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 598-599, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Resumption of the account of Ibn Isاaq: Salamah b. al-Akwa' was accompanied by a slave of Talbah b. 'Ubaydallah, and with the slave was a horse of Tall}ah's that he was leading. When Salamah went up into al-Wada' Pass, he saw some of [the raiders'] horsemen) so he looked in the direction of Sal' and shouted, "A raid!" Then he set out at full speed after the enemy-he was like a beast of prey. Having overtaken them, he began to turn them away with arrows. When he shot, he would say, "Take that from me"-
I am Ibn al-Akwa'!
Today is the day for the mean [to receive destruction].
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, p. 48, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 601, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Many of the Banu al-Mustaliq were wounded on that day. 'Ali b. Abi Talib killed two of them: Malik and his son. The Messenger of God took many captives, and they were divided among all the Muslims. Juwayriyah bt. al-Harith b. Abi Dirar, [who became] the wife of the Prophet, was one of the captives.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, p. 56, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 610, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq 493
Resumption of the account of Ibn 'Abd al-A'la and Ya'qub: 'Urwah said: "This man has offered you a sensible proposal. Accept it, and let me go to him." They said, "Go to him." So 'Urwah went to the Prophet and began speaking to him . The Prophet spoke as he had spoken to Budayl. Then 'Urwah said: "Muhammad, tell me: if you extirpate your tribesmen, have you ever heard of any of the Arabs who destroyed his own race before you? And if the contrary comes to pass, by God I see both prominent people and rabble who are likely to flee and leave you." Abu Bakr said, "Go suck the clitoris of al-Lat! "-al-Lat was the idol of Thaqif, which they used to worship-"Would we flee and leave him?" "Who is this?" asked 'Urwah. They said, "Abu Bakr." 'Urwah said, "By the One who holds my soul in His hand, were it not for a favor you did me for which I have not repaid you, I would answer you."
'Urwah [again] began speaking to the Prophet. As often as he spoke to him, he took hold of his beard. Al-Mughirah b. Shu'bah was standing next to the Prophet with his sword, wearing a mail neck-protector, and whenever Urwah extended his hand toward the Prophet's beard, al-Mughirah struck his hand with the lower end of the scabbard and said, "Take your hand away from his beard!" 'Urwah raised his head and asked, "Who is this?" They said, "Al-Mughirah b. Shu'bah." 'Urwah said, "Treacherous man, am I not trying to rectify your act of treachery?" (During the Time of Ignorance al-Mughirah b. Shu'bah had accompanied some men and killed them and taken their money. Later he had come and accepted Islam. The Prophet had said, "As for your Islam, we accept it; but the money is money of treachery for which we have no need.")
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 76-77, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 626-627, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq 502
While the Messenger of God was writing the document-he and Suhayl b. 'Amr-suddenly Abu Jandal, the son of Suhayl b. 'Amr, came walking with short steps in shackles. He had escaped to the Messenger of God. The companions of the Messenger of God had set out not doubting that they would conquer, because of a vision the Messenger of God had seen. Therefore, when they saw what they saw-the peace, the retreat, and the obligations the Messenger of God had taken on himself-the people felt so grieved about it that they were close to despair. When Suhayl saw Abu Jandal, he went up to him, struck him on the face, and grabbed him by the front of his garment. "Muhammad," he said, "the pact was ratified between me and you before this fellow came to you." "You are right," he replied. Suhayl began pulling and dragging [his son Abu Jandal] by the front of his garment to return him to Quraysh. Abu Jandal began screaming at the top of his voice, "People of the Muslims, shall I be returned to the polytheists for them to torment me for my religion?" This made the people feel even worse. The Messenger of God said: "Abu Jandal, count on a reward, for God will give you and those who are oppressed with you relief and a way out. We have made a treaty and peace between ourselves and these people; we have given them and they have given us a promise, and we will not act treacherously toward them."
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 86-87, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 635, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Abu Bair departed with the two men. When he was at Dhu al-Hulayfah, he sat against a wall, and his two companions sat with him. Abu Bair said, "Is this sword of yours sharp, O tribesman of the Banu 'Amir?" "Yes," he replied. "May I look at it?" he said. "If you wish," he replied. Abu Bair unsheathed it, attacked the man with it, and killed him. The mawla hurried away and came to the Messenger of God while the latter was sitting in the mosque. When the Messenger of God caught sight of him, he said, "This man has seen something fearful." When he reached the Messenger of God, the latter asked, "Alas, what has happened to you?" The man replied, "Your companion killed my companion." By God, while the man was still there, Abu Bair appeared girded with the sword and halted before the Messenger of God, saying: "Messenger of God, your obligation has been fulfilled and has been discharged from you. You surrendered me and returned me to them, but God rescued me from them." The Prophet said: "Woe to his mother! A kindler of war's fire"-Ibn Ishaq, in his account, said "a stirrer up of war"-"if he had men with him!" When Abu Basir heard this, he knew that he would return him to them. So Abu Bair went out and encamped at al-'Is, in the vicinity of Dhu al-Marwah, on the coast of the sea, on the route that Quraysh used to take to Syria. The words that the Messenger of God had spoken to Abu Basir-"Woe to his mother! A stirrer up of war if he had men with him!"-were, reported to the Muslims who were confined in Mecca, and they went out to Abu Basir at al-'Is. Abu Jandal b. Suhayl b. 'Amr escaped and joined Abu Basir. Nearly seventy such men gathered around him, and they harassed Quraysh. By God, whenever they heard of a caravan of Quraysh that had set out for Syria, they intercepted it, killed the men, and took their goods. Quraysh therefore sent to the Prophet, imploring him for the sake of God and the bond of kinship to send word to them that whoever came to him would be safe. So the Messenger of God gave them refuge, and they came to him in Medina.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 90-91, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 639, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to al-Waqidi In this year the Messenger of God dispatched the raiding party of Abu 'Ubaydah b. al-Jarrah to Dhu al-Qassah in the month of Rabi' II with forty men. They traveled through the night on foot and reached Dhu al-Qassah just before dawn. They raided the inhabitants, who escaped them by fleeing to the mountains, and took cattle, old clothes, and a single man. He became a Muslim, and the Messenger of God released him.

In this year a raiding party led by Zayd b. Harithah went to al-Jamum He captured a woman of the Muzaynah named Halimah, who guided them to an encampment of the Banu Sulaym, where they captured cattle, sheep, and prisoners. Among the prisoners was Halimah's husband. When Zayd brought back what he had taken, the Messenger of God granted to the woman of Muzaynah her husband and her freedom. In this year a raiding party led by Zayd b. Harithah went to al-'Is in Jumada I. During it, the property that was with Abu al-'As b. al-Rabi' was taken. He asked the Prophet's daughter Zaynab to grant him refuge, and she did so.
In this year a fifteen-man raiding party led by Zayd b. Harithah went to al-Taraf in Jumada II against the Banu Tha'labah. The Bedouins fled, fearing that the Messenger of God had set out against them. Zayd took twenty camels from their herds. He was away four nights.

In this year a raiding party led by Zayd b. Harithah went to Hisma in Jumada II. According to [al-Waqidi]--Musa b. Muhammad--his father [Muhammad b. Ibrahim], who said: The beginning of this incident was when Dihyah al-Kalbi came back from the court of Caesar, who had presented Dihyah with gifts of merchandise and clothing. When Dihyah reached Hisma, men from Judham intercepted him and robbed him, leaving him with nothing. He came to the Messenger of God even before entering his own house [in Medina] and informed him. The Messenger of God then sent Zayd b. Harithah to Hisma.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 93-94, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 641-642, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Her story is as follows. According to Ibn Humayd- -Salamah--Ibn Ishaq-'Abdallah b. Abi Bakr, who said: The Messenger of God sent Zayd b. Harithah to Wadi al-Qura, where he encountered the Banu Fazarah. Some of his companions were killed there, and Zayd was carried away wounded from among the slain. One of those killed was Ward b. 'Amr, one of the Band Sa'd b. Hudhaym: he was killed by one of the Banu Badr [b. Fazarah]. When Zayd returned, he vowed that no washing [to cleanse him] from impurity should touch his head until he had raided the Fazarah. After he recovered from his wounds, the Messenger of God sent him with an army against the Banu Fazarah. He met them in Wadi al-Qura and inflicted casualties on them. Qays b. al-Musaliliar al-Ya'muri killed Mas'adah b. Hakamah b. Malik b. Badr and took Umm Qirfah prisoner. (Her name was Falimah bt. Rabi'ah b. Badr. She was married to Malik b. Hudhayfah b. Badr. She was very old woman.) He also took one of Umm Qirfah's daughters and 'Abdallah b. Mas'adah prisoner. Zayd b. Harithah ordered Qays to kill Umm Qirfah, and he killed her cruelly. He tied each of her legs with a rope and tied the ropes to two camels, and they split her in two. Then they brought Umm Qirfah's daughter and 'Abdallah b. Mas'adah to the Messenger of God. Umm Qirfah's daughter belonged to Salamah b. 'Amr b. al-Akwa', who had taken her-she was a member of a distinguished family among her people: the Arabs used to say, "Had you been more powerful than Umm Qirfah, you could have done no more." The Messenger of God asked Salamah for her, and Salamah gave her to him. He then gave her to his maternal uncle, Hazn b. Abi Wahb, and she bore him 'Abd al-Ral}man b. Hazn.

The other version of the story of this expedition-from Salamah b. al-Akwa'-is that its commander was Abu Bakr b. Abi Quhafah. According to al-Hasan b. Yahya--Abu 'Amir--'Ikrimah b. 'Ammar--Iyas b. Salamah--his father [Salamah b. al-Akwa'], who said: The Messenger of God appointed Abu Bakr as our commander, and we raided some of the Banu Fazarah. When we came near the watering place, Abu Bakr ordered us to halt for a rest. After we prayed the dawn prayer, Abu Bakr ordered us to launch the raid against them. We went down to the watering place, and there we killed some people. I saw a group of people, women and children among them, who had almost outstripped us to the mountain; so I sent an arrow between them and the mountain. When they saw the arrow, they stopped, and I led them back to Abu Bakr. Among them was a woman of the Banu Fazarah wearing a worn-out piece of leather. With her was her daughter, among the fairest of the Arabs. Abu Bakr gave me her daughter as booty. When I returned to Medina, the Messenger of God met me in the market and said, "Salamah-how excellent the father who begot you!-give me the woman." I said, "Messenger of God, I like her, by God, and I have not uncovered her garment." He said nothing to me until the next day, when he met me in the market and said, "Salamah-how excellent a father begot you!-give me the woman." I said: "Messenger of God, I have not uncovered her garment. She is yours, Messenger of God." The Messenger of God sent her to Mecca, and with her he ransomed some Muslim captives who were in the hands of the polytheists. (This version of the story comes from Salamah.)

According to Muhammad b. 'Umar [al-Wagidi]: In this year a raiding party led by Kurz b. Jabir al-Fihri set out against the members of the Banu Uraynah who had killed the herdsman of the Messenger of God and driven off camels in Shawwal of the year 6. The Messenger of God sent Kurz with twenty horsemen.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 96-98, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 642-644, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--Ibn Shihab al-Zuhri--'Ubaydallah b. 'Abdallah b. 'Utbah b. Masud--'Abdallah b. 'Abbas--Abu Sufyan b. Barb, who said: We were merchant folk. The warfare between us and the Messenger of God had prevented us from journeying, so that our wealth became depleted. After the truce between us and the Messenger of God, we feared that we might not encounter security.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, p. 100, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 2, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 646, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Events of the Year 7:

The Expedition to Khaybar:
Then the year 7 began. The Messenger of God set out for Khaybar in the remainder of al-Mubarram, leaving Sibs' b. 'Urfutah al-Ghifari in charge of Medina. He traveled and halted with his army at a valley called al-Raji', encamping between the people of Khaybar and [the tribe of] Ghatafan (according to the account from In Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq) to prevent the latter from aiding the people of Khaybar, for they were going to back them against the Messenger of God.
It has been reported to me that, when Ghatafan heard that the Messenger of God had encamped near Khaybar, they assembled because of him and set out to aid the Jews against him. Having traveled a day's journey, they heard a sound behind them in their possessions and families. Thinking that the enemy had come at them from behind, they turned back and stayed with their families and possessions, leaving the way to Khaybar open to the Messenger of God. The Messenger of God began taking herds and property bit by bit and conquering Khaybar fortress by fortress. The first of their fortresses that he conquered was the fortress of Na'im. Mahmud b. Maslamah was killed at it-a millstone was hurled on him from it and killed him. Next was al-Qamus, the fortress of lbn Abi al-Huqayq. The Messenger of God took some of its people captive, including $afiyyah bt. Huyayy b. Akhtab (the wife of Kinanah b. al-Rabi' b. Abi al-Huqayq) and two daughters of her paternal uncle. The Messenger of God chose Safiyyah for himself. Dihyah al-Kalbi had asked the Messenger of God for Safiyyah; when the latter chose her for himself, he gave Dihyah her two cousins. The captives of Khaybar were divided among the Muslims. Then the Messenger of God began taking the fortresses and property that were closest to him.

According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--'Abdallah b. Abi Bakr-a member of the Aslam: The Banu Sahm, who were a part of Aslam, came to the Messenger of God and said, "Messenger of God, by God we have been struck by drought and possess nothing." But they found that the Messenger of God had nothing to give them. So the Prophet said: "O God, Thou knowest their condition-that they have no strength and that I have nothing to give them. Open to them [for conquest] the greatest of the fortresses of Khaybar, the one most abounding in food and fat meat." The next morning God opened the fortress of al-Sa'b b. Mu'adh for them [to conquer]. There was no fortress in Khaybar more abounding in food and fat meat than it. After the Messenger of God had conquered some of their fortresses and taken some of the property, they reached their fortress489 of al-Walih and al-Sulalim, which was the last of the fortresses of Khaybar to be conquered. The Messenger of God besieged the inhabitants between thirteen and nineteen nights.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 116-117, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 9-10, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
The Messenger of God besieged the [Jewish] people of Khaybar in their two fortresses of al-Watib and al-Sulalim. Finally, when they were certain that they would perish, they asked him to banish them and spare their lives, which he did. The Messenger of God had already taken all the property-al-Shiqq, Nalah, al-Katibah, and all their fortresses-except what belonged to those two fortresses. When the people of Fadak heard of what they had done, they sent word to the Messenger of God, asking him to banish them and spare their lives, and they would leave him their property; and he did so. Among the men who mediated between them and the Messenger of God in the matter was Muhayyisah b. Masud, a member of the Banu Harithah. When the people of Khaybar surrendered on these terms, they asked the Messenger of God to employ them on the properties for a half share. They said, "We know more about them than you and are better cultivators of them." So the Messenger of God made peace with them for a half share, provided that "if we want to make you leave, we may." The people of Fadak made peace with him on similar terms. Khaybar became the booty (fay') of the Muslims; Fadak belonged exclusively to the Messenger of God, because the Muslims had not attacked its people with horses or camels.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, p. 123, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 15, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:515
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq, who said: I asked Ibn Shihab al-Zuhri how the Messenger of God's grant to the Jews of Khaybar of their date palms, when he granted them the palm trees with the proviso of a tax on them, had taken place: did he concede them these terms as established [only] until his death, or for some necessity did he grant them to them without such a proviso? Ibn Shihab informed me that the Messenger of God conquered Khaybar by force after fighting. Khaybar was something that God gave as booty to His Messenger. The Messenger of God took one-fifth of it and divided [the remainder] among the Muslims. Those of the inhabitants who surrendered did so on condition that they should be expelled after having fought. The Messenger of God summoned them and said, "If you wish, we will deliver these properties to you on condition that you shall work them and that their produce shall be divided between us and you) I will allow you to remain as long as God allows you to remain." They accepted, and they worked the properties on those terms. The Messenger of God used to send 'Abdallah b. Rawahah; he would divide the produce and assess it fairly for the inhabitants. After the death of the Prophet, Abu Bakr after the Prophet confirmed the properties in their hands on the same terms of sharecropping on which the Messenger of God had dealt with them. When Abu Bakr died, 'Umar confirmed the sharecropping arrangement in the beginning of his term as commander) then, however, 'Umar was informed that the Messenger of God had said during his final illness, "Two religions cannot coexist in the Arabian peninsula." 'Umar investigated the matter until trustworthy evidence reached him; then he sent to the Jews, saying: "God has given permission for you to be expelled) for I have received word that the Messenger of God said that two religions cannot coexist in the Arabian peninsula. Let anyone who has a treaty from the Messenger of God bring it to me, and I will carry it out for him. Let any Jew who has no treaty from the Messenger of God make ready to leave." Thus 'Umar expelled any of them who had no treaty from the Messenger of God.
According to Abu Ja'far [al-Tabari]: Then the Messenger of God returned to Medina.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 129-130, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 20-21, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
In this year a raiding party led by Bashir b. Sa'd went to Yumn and Jinab in Shawwal of the year 7. According to [al-Waqidi]--Yaliya b. 'Abd al-'Aziz b. Sa'id--Sa'd b. Ubadah--Bashir b. Muhammad b. 'Abdallah b. Zayd, who said: What prompted this raiding party was that Husayl b. Nuwayrah al-Ashja'i, who had been the guide of the Messenger of God to Khaybar, came before the Prophet. The Prophet asked him, "What news do you bring?" He said, "I left a large gathering of Ghatafan at al-Jinab: 'Uyaynah b. Hisn has summoned them to march against you." So the Prophet summoned Bashir b. Sa'd, and the guide, Husayl b. Nuwayrah, went with him. They captured camels and sheep. A slave belonging to 'Uyaynah b. Hign met them, and they killed him. Then they encountered 'Uyaynah's army, which was put to flight. Al-Harith b. 'Awf met 'Uyaynah as he was fleeing and said, "The time has come, 'Uyaynah, for you to give up what yous plan."
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, p. 133, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 23, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
We gave them time until their herds had come back from pasture in the evening. After they had milked the camels, set them to rest by the watering trough, and had stopped moving around, after the first part of the night had passed, we launched the raid on them. We killed some of them, drove away the camels, and set out to return. Meanwhile, the party carrying the people's appeal for aid set out to the tribe to get help.

We traveled quickly. When we passed by al-Harith b. Malik (Ibn al-Barsa') and his companion, we took him with us. The party summoned to aid the people came at us. They were too powerful for us. However, when only the bottom of Qudayd Canyon was between us and them, God sent clouds from out of the blue, although we had seen neither rain nor clouds before that, and the result was [a torrent] that no one could risk [crossing]. We saw them looking at us, none of them able to risk it or advance, while we quickly drove off the camels. We took them up to al-Mushallal and then brought them down from it, and we eluded the tribesmen with what we had taken. I shall never forget the rajaz verses that one of the Muslims recited as he was driving the camels from behind:

Abu al-Qasim refuses to let you remain out all night
in [pasture] whose plants are moist and luxuriant,
their tops golden like the color of something gilded.

According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--a man from Aslam--a shaykh of Aslam: The battle cry of the companions of the Messenger of God that night was "Kill! Kill!"

According to al-Waqidi: The raiding party led by Ghalib b. 'Abdallah consisted of between thirteen and nineteen men.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 141-142, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 28, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
The Messenger of God made peace with them on condition that the Zoroastrians should be required [to pay] tax, that their sacrifices should not be eaten, and that one should not marry their women.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, p. 142, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 29, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Expeditions Involving Ibn Abi Hadrad and Abu Qatadah:

In Sha'ban of this year the Messenger of God sent out a party of men under the command of Abu Qatadah.
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq--Yahya b. Said al-Ansar--Muhammad b. Ibrahim--'Abdallah b. Abi Hadrad al-Aslami, who said: I married a woman from my tribe, promising her a nuptial gift (sadaq) of 200 dirhams. Then I came to the Messenger of God to seek his assistance with my marriage. He said, "How much did you set as the nuptial gift? " I said, "Two hundred dirhams, Messenger of God." "Praise God!" said he, "if you could take dirhams from a creek bed , you could not have gone higher! By God, I have nothing with which to help you."
I waited a few days. Then a man named Rifa'ah b. Qays or Qays b. Rifa'ah from the Banu Jusham b. Mu'awiyah arrived with a large group from Jusham. He encamped at al-Ghabah with his tribesmen and companions, intending to gather [the tribe of] Qays to make war on the Messenger of God. He was a man of name and standing in [the tribe of] Jusham. The Messenger of God summoned me and two other Muslims and said, "Go out to this man and either bring him to us or bring us a report and information about him." He presented us with an emaciated old camel and mounted one of us on it. By God, it was so weak that it could not stand up with him until the men propped it up from behind with their hands, and then it raised itself, though barely. Then he said, "Make do with her, and take turns riding."
We set out, armed with arrows and swords. We approached the encampment at evening as the sun was setting. I hid myself in one place and commanded my two companions to hide themselves somewhere else near the men's encampment. I told them, "If you hear me shout 'God is greatest!' and attack the encampment, shout 'God is greatest!' and attack with me."
By God, we kept watching for some heedlessness on their part or some way to strike them until night fell over us and the time of the darkness of the night prayer passed. One of their herdsman who had gone out in the area in the morning was late coming back, so that they became worried about him. Their leader, Rifa'ah b. Qays, stood up, took his sword, put [its belt] on his neck, and said: "By God, I am going to follow the tracks of this herdsman of ours. Some evil must have befallen him." Some of his companions said: "By God, do not go. We will take care of it for you." He said, "By God, no one but I shall go." They said, "And we with you!" "By God," he said, "none of you shall follow me !" He set out and passed by me. When he came within range, I shot him with an arrow and put it into his heart. By God, he spoke not a word. I leaped at him and cut off his head. Then I rushed toward the encampment and shouted "God is great!" My two companions rushed and shouted "God is great!" In no time at all, those who were in the encampment were shouting "Save yourself!" and "Quick, quick! " and taking all they could-wives, children, and any property light enough to carry. We drove away a great herd of camels and many sheep and goats and brought them to the Messenger of God. I brought him Rifa'ah's head, which I carried with me. The Messenger of God gave me thirteen camels from that herd as aid, and I consummated my marriage.

As for al-Waqidi, his account is as follows. According to al-Waqidi--Muhammad b. Yahya b. Sahl b. Abi Hathmah--his father [Yahya b. Sahl b. Abi Hathmah]: The Prophet sent Ibn Abi Hadrad in this party with Abu Qatadah. The party consisted of sixteen men, and they were away fifteen nights. Their shares [of booty] were twelve camels [for each man], each camel being accounted equal to ten sheep or goats. When the people fled in various directions, they took four women, including one young woman who was very beautiful. She fell to Abu Qatadah. Then Mahmiyah b. al-Jaz' spoke of her to the Messenger of God, and the Messenger of God asked Abu Qatadah about her. Abu Qatadah said, "I purchased her from the spoils." The Messenger of God said, "Give her to me." So he gave her to him, and the Messenger of God gave her to Mahmiyah b. Jaz' al-Zubaydi.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 149-151, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 34-36, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
The Expedition to Mu'tah:

According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq, who said: After the Messenger of God returned to Medina from Khaybar, he stayed in Medina for the two months of Rabi'; then, in Jumada I, he sent out his expedition to Syria whose members met with disaster at Mu'tah.
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq Muhammad b. Ja'far b. al-Zubayr--'Urwah b. al-Zubayr, who said: The Messenger of God sent his expedition to Mu'tah in Jumada I of the year 8. He put Zayd b. Harithah in command of the men and said, "If Zayd b. Harithah is killed, Ja'far b. Abi Talib shall be in command of the men; if Ja'far is killed, 'Abdallah b. Rawa^ah shall be in command." The men equipped themselves and made ready to set out. They numbered 3,000. When the time for their departure came, the people said goodbye to the commanders of the Messenger of God, wishing them safety and bidding them farewell. When 'Abdallah b. Rawahah said goodbye with the other commanders of the Messenger of God who were doing so, he wept. They said to him, "What is making you weep, Ibn Rawahah?" He said, "By God, I have no love of this world or excessive love for you, but I heard the Messenger of God recite a verse from the Book of God that mentioned the Fire [of Hell]-'Not one of you there is, but he shall go down to it; that for thy Lord is a thing decreed, determined'-and I do not know how I can come out after going down." The Muslims said, "May God accompany you, defend you, and bring you back to us in good health." Then 'Abdallah b. Rawahah recited:

But I ask the Merciful One for pardon,
and for a sword blow that makes a wide wound that shoots out foaming [blood];
Or a deadly thrust by a thirsty one,
by a lance that pierces right through the guts and the liver;
So that people shall say, when they pass my grave:
"God guided you aright, O warrior who followed the right way."

Then the men made ready to depart. 'Abdallah b. Rawahah went to the Messenger of God and said goodbye to him. The men set out, and the Messenger of God went out to see them off; having bidden them farewell, he returned from them. 'Abdallah b. Rawahah recited:

May [He who is] Peace supply the place [of the departing ones]
to a man to whom I bade farewell
among the palm trees-the best escort and friend!
They journeyed on and encamped at Mu'an in the land of Syria. The men learned that Heraclius had encamped with 100,000 Byzantines at Ma'ab in the territory of al-Balqa'. Joined to him were Arab auxiliaries from [the tribes of] Lakhm, Judham, Balqayn, Bahra', and Bali, numbering 100,000 and commanded by a man from [the tribe of] Bali and of the subdivision Irashah, named Malik b. Rafilah. When the Muslims received word of this, they stayed at Mu'an two nights, considering what to do. They said: "We will write to the Messenger of God and inform him of the number of our enemy. Either he will reinforce us with men or he will give us his command that we should return to him." 'Abdallah b. Rawahah encouraged the men, saying: "Men, by God, what you loathe is the very thing you came out to seek martyrdom. We do not fight the enemy by number, strength, or multitude; we fight them only by this religion with which God has honored us. Go forward, for it is one of two good things: victory or martyrdom." The men said, "By God, Ibn Rawahah has spoken the truth." So the men went forward.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 152-154, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 36-38, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq 533
Then Budayl b. Warqa' set out with a group of men from Khuza'ah. They came to the Messenger of God in Medina and told him what had befallen them and how Quraysh had backed the Banu Bakr against them; then they departed to return to Mecca. The Messenger of God had told them, "I think you will see Abu Sufyan come to strengthen the pact and extend the term." As Budayl b. Warga' and his companions traveled, they met Abu Sufyan at 'Usfan: Quraysh had sent him to the Messenger of God to strengthen the pact and extend the term, for they had become fearful of what they had done. When Abu Sufyan met Budayl, he said, "Where have you come from, Budayl?"-for he guessed that he had gone to the Messenger of God. Budayl said, "I traveled with the Khuza'ah along this shore and along the bottom of this valley." Abu Sufyan asked, "Didn't you go to Muhammad?" "No," he replied.

When Budayl set out for Mecca, Abu Sufyan said, "If in fact he went to Medina, he will have fed his camel date pits there." So he went to the place where his camel had rested, picked up some of its droppings, crumbled them, and saw date pits in them. "I swear by God," he said, "Budayl went to Muhammad!"
Abu Sufyan then set out and went to the Messenger of God in Medina. Abu Sufyan [first] visited his own daughter, Umm Habibah bt. Abi Sufyan. When he was about to sit on the bed of the Messenger of God, she folded it up to stop him. He said, "My daughter, by God, I don't know whether you think I am too good for this bed or you think it is too good for me." She said: "It is the bed of the Messenger of God, and you are an unclean polytheist. I did not want you to sit on the bed of the Messenger of God." He said, "My daughter, by God, evil came over you after you left me."
Then he went out and came to the Messenger of God. He spoke to him, but the Messenger of God gave him no reply. Then he went to Abu Bakr and asked him to speak to the Messenger of God for him, but Abu Bakr said, "I will not do it." Then he went to 'Umar b. al-Khattab and spoke to him. 'Umar said: "I intercede for you with the Messenger of God! By God, if I found only ant grubs [to eat], I would fight you!" Abu Sufyan then left and went to see 'All b. Abi Talib. Fatimah, the daughter of the Messenger of God, was with him, and with her was al-Iiasan b. 'All, a young child crawling before her. Abu Sufyan said: "'All, you are the nearest of the men to me in kinship and the closest of them in relationship. I have come with a request, and I will not go back empty-handed as I came. Intercede for us with the Messenger of God!" He said: "Woe to you, Abu Sufyan. By God, the Messenger of God has determined on a matter about which we cannot speak to him." Abu Sufyan then turned to Fatimah and said, "Daughter of Muhammad, don't you want to command your little son here to make peace among the people, so that he will be lord of the Arabs forever?" "By God," she said, "my little son is not old enough to make peace among the people, and no one can do so against the will of the Messenger of God." Abu Sufyan said [addressing 'Ali]: "Abu al-Hasan, I see that matters have become difficult for me. Give me advice!" 'Ali said to him: "By God, I know of nothing that will be of any use to you. However, since you are the lord of the Banu Kinanah, go and make peace among the people, and then return to your country." Abu Sufyan asked, "Do you think that will be of any use to me? " "No, by God," replied 'Ali, "I do not think so, but I can find nothing else for you to do." So Abu Sufyan stood up in the mosque and said, "People, I hereby make peace among the people." Then he mounted his camel and departed.

When Abu Sufyan came to Quraysh, they asked, "What is your news?" He said: "I went to Muhammad and spoke to him; and, by God, he gave me no reply. Then I went to In Abi Quhafah and got nothing good from him. Then I went to Ibn al-Khattab, whom I found to be the most hostile of them. Then I went to 'Ali b. Abi Talib, whom I found to be the mildest of them. He advised me to do something that I have done, but, by God, I do not know whether it will be of any use tome or not." They asked, "What did he command you?" He replied, "He commanded me to make peace among the people, and I did it." They asked, "Has Muhammad approved it?" No," he said. "Woe to you!" they said. "By God, he did no more than play with you. What you have said is of no use to us." Abu Sufyan replied, "No, by God, I found nothing else to do."
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 163-165, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 45-47, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Abu Kurayb--Yunus b. Bukayr--Muhammad b. Ishaq--Husayn b. 'Abdallah b. 'Ubaydallah b. 'Abbas--'Ikrimah-Ibn 'Abbas, who said: When the Messenger of God encamped at Marr al-Zahran, al-'Abbas b. 'Abd al-Muttalib said, the Messenger of God having departed from Medina: "Woe to Quraysh! If the Messenger of God surprises them in their territory and enters Mecca by force, it means the destruction of Quraysh forever." So he seated himself on the white mule of the Messenger of God and said, "I will go out to al-Arak; perhaps I shall see a firewood gleaner, or someone bringing milk, or someone coming in who will enter Mecca and inform them where the Messenger of God is, so that they will go to him and ask him for a promise of safety."
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, p. 171, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 52, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--'Abdallah b. Abi Najih: When the Prophet sent his army in divisions from Dhu Tuwa, he commanded al-Zubayr, who was in charge of the left wing, to make his entry with some of the forces by way of Kuda. He commanded Sa'd b. Ubadah to make his entry with some of the forces by way of Kada'. Some scholars assert that when Sa'd was sent out, he said as he made his entry, "Today is the day of battle) today the sacred territory is deemed profane." Hearing this, one of the Emigrants said: "Messenger of God, hear what Sa'd b. 'Ubadah has said! We fear that he may assault Quraysh." The Messenger of God said to 'Ali b. Abi Talib: "Overtake him, and take the banner. You be the one who takes it in!"
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 176-177, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 56, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq, who said: When the Messenger of God ordered his commanders to enter Mecca, he charged them to kill no one except those who fought them; however, he gave charge concerning a group of men whom he named: he ordered that they should be killed even if they were found under the curtains of the Ka'bah. Among them was 'Abdallah b. Sa'd b. Abi Sari b. Hubayb b. Jadhimah b. Nasr b. Malik b. Hisl b. 'Amir b. Lu'ayy. The Messenger of God ordered that he should be killed only because he had become a Muslim and then had reverted to being a polytheist. He fled to 'Uthman, who was his foster-brother, and 'Uthman hid him. 'Uthman later brought him to the Messenger of God after the people of Mecca had become calm. He asked the Messenger of God to grant him a promise of safety. The Messenger of God is said to have remained silent for a long time and then to have said yes. After 'Uthman had taken him away, the Messenger of God said to his companions who were around him, "By God, I kept silent so that one of you might go up to him and cut off his head!" One of the Anger said, "Why didn't you give me a signal, Messenger of God? " He replied, "A prophet does not kill by making signs."

Also among them was 'Abdallah b. Khatal, a member of the Banu Taym b. Ghalib. The Messenger of God ordered that he should be killed only for the following reason: He was a Muslim, and the Messenger of God had sent him to collect alms, sending with him one of the Ansar. With him went a mawla of his, also a Muslim, to serve him. He halted at a resting place and commanded the mawla to slaughter him a goat and make him a meal; then he went to sleep. When he woke up, the mawla had done nothing for him; so he attacked him and killed him. Then he reverted to being a polytheist. He had two singing girls, Fartana and another with her. The two used to sing satire about the Messenger of God; so the latter commanded that the two of them should be killed along with him.
Also among them was al-Huwayrith b. Nuqaydh b. Wahb b. 'Abd b. Qusayy. He was one of the men who used to molest the Messenger of God in Mecca.
Also among them was Miqyas b. Subabah. The Messenger of God commanded that he should be killed only because he had killed the member of the Ansar who had killed his brother by mistake and had then returned to Quraysh as a renegade.
Also among them were 'Ikrimah b. Abi Jahl and Sarah, a mawlah of one of the sons of 'Abd al-Muttalib. She was one of those who used to molest the Messenger of God in Mecca. 'Ikrimah b. Abi Jahl fled to Yemen. His wife, Umm Hakim bt. al-Harith b. Hisham, became a Muslim. She asked the Messenger of God to grant `Ikrimah a promise of safety, and he did so. She set out to find him and then brought him to the Messenger of God. `Ikrimah, as people relate, used to say that what brought him back to Islam after his departure for Yemen was-in his own words: I was about to set sail for Ethiopia. When I came to board the ship, its captain said, "Servant of God, do not board my ship until you declare God to be one and repudiate any peers to Him; for I fear that if you do not do so, we shall perish in it." So I asked, "Does no one board until he declares God to be one and repudiates all others?" "Yes," he said, "no one boards until he clears himself." So I asked: Why then should I depart from Muhammad? By God, this is the very message he brought to us: that our God on the sea is [the same as] our God on land! At that moment I came to know Islam, and it entered into my heart.
'Abdallah b. Khalal was killed by Said b. Hurayth al-Makhzumi and Abu Barzah al-Aslami: the two shared in his blood. Miqyas b. Subabah was killed by Numaylah b. 'Abdallah, a man of his own clan. The sister of Miqyas said:

By my life, Numaylah shamed his clan
and distressed winter guests by [killing] Miqyas.
How excellent it was for one to see a man like Miqyas
in times when no food was prepared even for women in childbirth!

As for Ibn Khatal's two singing girls, one was killed and the other fled. The Messenger of God later was asked to grant her a promise of safety, and he did so. [As for Sarah, he was asked to grant her a promise of safety, and he did so.] She lived until someone in the time of 'Umar b. al-Khattab caused his horse to trample her at al-Abtah and killed her. Al-Huwayrith b. Nuqaydh was killed by 'Ali b. Abi Talib.
According to al-Waqidi: The Messenger of God commanded that six men and four women should be killed. Of the men, [al-Waqidi] mentioned those whom Ibn Ishaq named. The women he mentioned were Hind bt. 'Utbah b. Rabi'ah, who became a Muslim and swore allegiance; Sarah, the mawlah of 'Amr b. Hashim b. 'Abd al-Muttalib b. 'Abd Manaf, who was killed on that day; Quraybah, who was killed on that day; and Fartana, who lived until the caliphate of 'Uthman.

According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq--'Umar b. Musa b. al-Wajih--Qatadah al-Sadusi: Having halted by the door of the Ka'bah, the Messenger of God stood up and said: "There is no god but God alone; He has no partner. He has fulfilled His promise and helped His servant. He alone has put to flight the parties who leagued together. Behold, every alleged claim of hereditary privilege, or blood, or wealth is abolished, except the custodianship of the Ka'bah and the right of supplying water to pilgrims. Behold, the one slain by an error that is like intention, [by] whip or staff-for both cases the blood money shall be made rigorous: [a hundred camels], forty of them with their foals in their wombs. People of Quraysh, God has taken from you the haughtiness of the Time of Ignorance and its pride in ancestors. Mankind is from Adam, and Adam was created from dust." Then the Messenger of God recited: "O mankind, We have created you male and female, and made you nations and tribes, that you may know one another. Surely the noblest among you in the sight of God is the most god-fearing of you"-to the end of the verse. "People of Quraysh and people. of Mecca, what do you think I intend to do with you?" "Good," they said, "[for you are] a generous fellow tribesman and the son of a generous fellow tribesman!" Then he said, "Go, for you are 'those whose bonds have been loosed.'" Thus the Messenger of God emancipated them, although God had enabled him to take their persons by force and they were his booty. Therefore the people of Mecca are known as al-Tulaqa' (Those Whose Bonds Have Been Loosed).
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 178-182, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 58-61, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
See Also Ishaq:550
According to Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--a certain scholar--a man from the Banu Jadhimah, who said: When Khalid commanded us to put down our weapons, one of our men, named Jahdam, said: "Alas for you, Banu Jadhimah! It is Khalid. By God, after you lay down your weapons, it will be nothing but leather manacles, and after leather manacles it will be nothing but the smiting of necks. By God, I will never lay down my weapon!" Some of his fellow tribesmen took him and said: "Jahdam, do you want to cause our blood to be shed? The people have become Muslims. The war has ended, and the people are at peace." The people did not desist from him until they had taken away his weapon and had laid down their weapons because of what Khalid had said.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Michael Fishbein, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. VIII, SUNY Press, pp. 189-190, ISBN 0-7914-3149-5, 1997, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2028/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 67, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq--'Abdallah b. Abi Bakr: The Messenger of God marched with two thousand Meccans and ten thousand of his companions [who had marched with him and] with whose support God had facilitated the conquest of Mecca. Thus they were twelve thousand in all. The Messenger of God placed 'Attab b. Asid b. Abi al-'Is b. Umayyah b. 'Abd Shams in charge of Mecca [to look after] the men who stayed behind while he proceeded to confront Hawazin.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, p. 8, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 73, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--one of the Banu Sa'd b. Bakr: That day, the Messenger of God said to the horsemen whom he sent [in pursuit] that if they could get hold of Bijad, a man from the Banu Sa'd b. Bakr, then they should not let him escape, for he had done something evil. When the Muslims seized him they herded him with his family and his sister al-Shayma' bt. al-Harith b. 'Abdallah b. 'Abd al 'Uzza, foster-sister of the Messenger of God, [like cattle] and treated her roughly. She told the Muslims that she was the foster-sister of the Messenger of God, but they did not believe her until they brought her to the Messenger of God.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, pp. 18-19, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 80-81, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
[The Siege of al-Ta'if:]
'Ali b. Nasr b. 'Ali [al-Jahdami]--'Abd al-Samad b. 'Abd al-Warith--'Abd al-Warith b. 'Abd al-Samad b. 'Abd al-Warith--his father--Aban al-'Altar--Hisham b. 'Urwah-'Urwah: When he had finished at Hunayn, the Messenger of God and his companions went directly to al-'Wa'if and encamped there for a fortnight, waging war against Thaqif. Thaqif fought the Muslims from behind the fort and none came out in the open. All of the surrounding people surrendered and sent their delegations to the Messenger of God. After besieging al-Ta'if for a fortnight, the Prophet left and halted at al-Ji'ranah where the captives of Hunayn were held with their women and children. It is alleged that those captives taken from the Hawazin numbered six thousand with women and children. When he reached al-Ji'ranah, the delegations of Hawazin came to the Prophet and embraced Islam. Therefore, he set all their women and children free and decided to make the lesser pilgrimage (directly[ from al-Ji'ranah. The month was Dhu al-Qa'dah. After that, the Messenger of God returned to Medina, put ['Attab b. Asid] in charge of Mecca, and asked him to perform the greater pilgrimmage with the people and to ensure their safety. [He also left behind with him Mu'adh b. Jabal] to instruct [the people] in Islam. When he reached Medina, the delegations of Thagif arrived, brought the dispute (mentioned earlier) before him, and gave him the oath of allegiance, which consisted of a document that they wrote and signed with him.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, pp. 20-21, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 82, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Then the Messenger of God went on until he halted near al-Ta'if and pitched his camp there. Some of his companions were killed by arrows, because the camp had been placed very close to the walls of al-Ta'if and the arrows were reaching them. The Muslims were unable to get through its wall, for [the inhabitants] had shut the gate against them . When his comrades were killed by arrows, the Prophet moved to higher ground and pitched his camp near where his mosque stands today. He besieged them for some twenty days. He had two of his wives with him, one of whom was Umm Salamah bt. Abi Umayyah. Al-Waqidi states that the other was Zaynab bt. Jahsh. He pitched two tents for them and prayed between the tents as long as he stayed there. After Thaqif surrendered, `Amr b. Umayyah b. Wahb b. Mu'attib b. Malik built a mosque over the place where the Messenger of God had prayed. There was a column in that mosque about which it is alleged that the sun never rises over it any day without a creaking noise being heard from it. The Messenger of God besieged Thaqif and fought them bitterly. Both sides shot arrows at each other until the day when the wall of al-Ta'if was stormed (shadkhah). [That day] a number of the Messenger of God's companions went under a testudo and advanced up to the wall [to make a breach in it]. Thaqif showered them with scraps of hot iron, so they came out from under [the testudo], and Thaqif shot them with arrows, killing some of them. The Messenger of God then ordered that the vineyards of Thaqif be cut down, and the men fell upon them, cutting them down.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, pp. 22-23, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 83-84, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
When the people began to move out, Sa'id b. 'Ubayd b. Asid b. Abi 'Amr b. 'Ilaj al-Thaqafi cried out that [al-Ta'if] was holding out [against the siege]. 'Uyaynah b. Hisn responded, "Yes, admirably and nobly! " One of the Muslims said to him, "May God smite you, O 'Uyaynah! Do you praise the polytheists for holding out against the Messenger of God while you [yourself] have come to assist him?" He replied, 'By God, I did not come to fight Thaqif with you, but I wished Muhammad to be victorious over al-Ta'if, so that I might obtain a slave girl from Thaqif whom I might make pregnant so that she might bear me a son, for Thaqif are clever people (manakir)."
At al-Ta'if, twelve of the Messenger of God's companions were martyred, seven from Quraysh, one from Banu Layth , and four from the Ansar.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, pp. 25-26, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 85, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
The Messenger of God went ahead earnestly with his preparations for the expedition and ordered the men to get ready quickly. He urged and persuaded the people of means [to help in meeting] the expenses and [to provide] mounts for the cause of God. The men of means provided mounts [in anticipation of] God's reward. 'Uthman b. 'Affan spent a huge sum, more than anyone had ever done, on this expedition.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, p. 49, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 102, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
When the Messenger of God reached Tabuk, Yuhannah b. Ru'bah, governor of Aylah, came to him, made a treaty with him, and offered him the poll tax [jizyah]. The people of jarbi' and Adhruh also offered him the poll tax, and the Messenger of God wrote a document for each of them which is still in their possession.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, p. 58, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 108, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--Shayban b. Sa'd al-Ta'i: It has been reported to me that 'Adi b. Hatim of Tayyi' used to say, "No Arab disliked the Messenger of God when he first heard about him more than I. As far as I was concerned, I was a noble man, a Christian, traveling about among my people and collecting the fourth part of their spoils (mirba) I professed my own religion, and the way I was treated was as if I were a king among my people. When I heard the Messenger of God I disliked him and said to an Arab slave of mine who was herding my camels, 'May you have no father! Prepare for me some docile, fat, and old camels, and keep them near me. When you hear of Muhammad's army treading this country, inform me."' He did that, and one morning he came to me and said, "O 'Adi, whatever you were going to do when Muhammad 's cavalry should descend upon you, do it now, for I have seen banners and when I inquired about them I was told that they were Muhammad's army." I asked him to bring my camels, which he did, and I took my family and children and told him that I would join my fellow Christians in Syria. I traveled to al-Jushiyyah and left one of Hatim's daughters in that settlement. When I reached Syria I stayed there.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, pp. 64-65, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 112-113, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
The Messenger of God said to Thabit b. Qays b. Shammas, a brother of Balharith b. al-Khazraj, "Get up and answer the man's speech." Thabit got up and said: "Praise belongs to God who created heaven and earth and carried out His command therein, and His knowledge encompasses His Throne. Nothing exists but by His bounty. By His power He made us kings and chose the best of His creation as a prophet who is the noblest in lineage, the most truthful in speech, and the best in noble descent. He sent down to him His book and entrusted him with His creatures. He was the chosen one of God from the worlds. Then he summoned people to faith, and the Emigrants from his people and his kinsfolk believed in the Messenger of God. They are the most noble people in lineage, the most prominent, and the best in deeds. Then the first of creation to answer and respond to God when the Messenger of God summoned them were ourselves. We are the Helpers of God and the viziers of His Messenger, and we fight people until they believe in God. He who believes in God and His Messenger has protected his life and possessions [from us]; as for one who disbelieves, we will fight him forever in the cause of God and killing him is a small matter to us. I say this and ask God's forgiveness for myself and the believing men and the believing women. Peace be upon you."
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, p. 69, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 116, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
"Malik B. Murrah al-Rahawi has reported to me that you were the first from Himyar to embrace Islam and that you have killed the polytheists, so rejoice at your good fortune. I order you to treat Himyar well. Do not be treacherous and do not forsake each other. The Messenger of God is the master of [both] your rich and your poor. Alms are neither lawful to Muhammad nor to his family; it is a purifying tax to be spent on poor Muslims and the wayfarer. Malik has conveyed only the necessary information but has kept [others'] secrets to himself, so I order you to treat him well. I have sent to you some of the most virtuous of my people, the most religious and the most learned, so I order you to treat them well, for he [i.e., Mu'adh b. Jabal] will be accountable for them. May the Peace, Mercy, and Blessings of God be on you."
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, p. 76, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 121-122, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Abu Ja'far [al-Tabari]: In this year, alms (al-Sadaqat) were made obligatory, and the Messenger of God dispatched his agents to collect them.
In this year, the following verse was revealed: "Take alms from their wealth to purify them." The reason for its revelation was the story about the affair of Tha'labah b. Hatib mentioned by Abu Amamah al-Bahili.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, p. 79, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 123-124, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
The Events of the Year 10:

Abu Ja'far [al-Tabari]: In this year, in the month of Rabi' II (it is said in the month of Rabi' I, or in Jumada I), the Messenger of God sent Khalid b. al-Walid with an army of four hundred to the Bann al-Harith b. Ka'b.

Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Ibn Ishaq--'Abdallah b. Abi Bakr: The Messenger of God sent Khalid b. al-Walid in the month of Rabi' II, or Jumada I, in the year 10/631 to the Balharith b. Ka'b in Najran, and ordered him to invite them to Islam for three days before he fought them. If they should respond to him.[with the acceptance of Islam], then he was to accept it from them, and to stay with them and teach them the Book of God, the sunnah of His prophet, and the requirements of Islam (ma'alim al-islam); if they should decline, then he was to fight them. Khalid departed and came to them, sending out riders in every direction inviting them to Islam and saying, "O people, accept Islam, and you will be safe." So they embraced Islam and responded to his call. Khalid stayed with them, teaching them Islam, the Book of God, and the sunnah of His prophet,
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, pp. 82-83, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 126, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--'Abdallah b. Abi Bakr: Surad b. 'Abdallah al-Azdi came to the Messenger of God with the deputation from al-Azd, embraced Islam, and became a good Muslim. The Messenger of God invested him with authority over those of his people who had embraced Islam and ordered him to fight the polytheists from the tribes of the Yemen with them. Surad b. 'Abdallah then left with an army by the Messenger of God's command and alighted at Jurash, which at that time was a closed city inhabited by Yemeni tribes. Khath'am had sought refuge with them, and when they heard that the Muslims were marching they shut themselves in it. The Muslims besieged them for about a month but the tribes refrained from coming out of the city. Surad withdrew from them, appearing to return. While he was near a mountain called Kashar, the inhabitants of Jurash, thinking that he had fled from them, came out in pursuit of him. When they overtook him he turned on them and inflicted a heavy loss on them.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, p. 88, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 130, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Abu Ja'far [al-Tabari]: The military expeditions (ghazawat) in which the Messenger of God personally participated were twenty-six. Some say that they were twenty-seven. Those who maintain the number as twenty-six count the Prophet's expedition to Khaybar and the expedition from there to Wadi al-Qura as one, because after accomplishing the victory he did not return from Khaybar to his abode but marched from there to Wadi al-Qura. Those who say that [the expeditions] were twenty-seven count the Khaybar expedition as one and the Wadi al-Qura expedition as another, making the number as twenty-seven.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, pp. 115-116, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 152, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Ibn Humayd--Salamah--Muhammad b. Ishaq--Muhammad b. Ja`far b. al-Zubayr--`Abdallah b. Unays: The Messenger of God called me and said, "It has reached me that Khalid b. Sufyan b. Nubayb al-Hudhali is gathering a force to attack me. He is either in Nakhlah or `Uranah, so go to him and kill him." I replied, "O Messenger of God, describe him to me so that I might know him." He said, "When you see him he will remind you of Satan. [A sure] sign between you and him is that when you see him you will feel a shudder." I went out, girding on my sword, until I came to him while he was in howdah with the women, seeking a halting place for them at the time for afternoon prayer. When I saw him I found him to be as the Messenger of God had described. I advanced toward him, but fearing that there might be acrimony between me and him which would distract me from the prayer, I prayed, making gestures with my head as I walked toward him. When I got to him he asked who I was, and I replied, "An Arab who has come to you because he has heard about you and your gathering [a force] against this fellow [i.e., Muhammad]." He said, "Yes, I am doing that." I walked a short distance with him and when it was feasible for me I struck him with my sword and killed him. Then I departed, leaving his women to throw themselves at him. When I came to the Messenger of God and greeted him, he looked at me and asked, "Is the objective accomplished?" I replied, "I have killed him." "You have said the truth," he replied. Then he stood up and went"' into his house and gave me a stick, saying, "Keep this stick with you O `Abdallah b. Unays." When I went out with it the people asked me what that stick was. I told them that the Messenger of God had given it to me and asked me to keep it with me. They told me to go back to him and ask him the reason for that. So I went back to him and said, "O Messenger of God, why did you give me this stick?" He replied, "[As a] sign between me and you on the day of resurrection. There will be a few men at that time who will carry sticks tied to their waists (al-mutakhassirun)." `Abdallah, therefore, fastened the stick to his sword, where it remained with him until his death, when he ordered that it should be fastened to his body with the shroud and buried with him.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, pp. 121-122, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, pp. 156-157, https://app.turath.io/book/9783 
Al-Harith b. Muhammad-Ibn Sad-Muhammad b. 'Umar: The armies and the raiding parties sent by the Messenger of God [between the time of his arrival in Medina and his death] were forty-eight.
al-Tabari (d. 923), Ismail K. Poonawala, ed, The History of al-Tabari [Ta’rikh al-rusul wa’l-muluk], vol. IX, SUNY Press, p. 123, ISBN 0-88706-691-7, 1990, https://archive.org/details/HistoryAlTabari40Vol/History_Al-Tabari_10_Vol/page/n2267/mode/2up 
أبو جعفر الطبري, تاريخ الرسل والملوك, vol. 3, al-Maktabah al-Shamilah, p. 158, https://app.turath.io/book/9783