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==Roman North Africa and Early Life==
 
==Roman North Africa and Early Life==
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Before the [[Islam|Islamic]] conquest, Northern [[Africa]] was a province of the Roman (Byzantine) Empire. At that time it comprised [[Tunisia]], north [[Algeria]] and some parts of [[Morocco]]. Northern Roman Africa, reconquered in 533 AD by Emperor Justinian, was an Exarchate - a single province with virtual autonomy, governed by a supreme official called the Exarch.  
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Before the [[Islam|Islamic]] [[Jihad|conquest]], Northern Africa was a province of the Roman (Byzantine) Empire. At that time it comprised Tunisia, north Algeria and some parts of Morocco. Northern Roman Africa, reconquered in 533 AD by Emperor Justinian, was an Exarchate - a single province with virtual autonomy, governed by a supreme official called the Exarch.  
    
The Exarchate's capital was the ancient city of Carthage. After Justinian's invasion, Africa experienced many decades of peace and relative prosperity. At a time when almost the rest of the Roman world was engulfed in conflict and conflagration, the Exarchate of Carthage remained an oasis of relative stability. Peace brought economic prosperity. Its grain was exported, along with goods produced by its artisans, especially their red pottery which was renowned throughout the Empire. With luminaries such as Pristian, Corippus, Victor of Tunis and Aldhelm, Africa also rose to become one of the intellectual centers of the world.  
 
The Exarchate's capital was the ancient city of Carthage. After Justinian's invasion, Africa experienced many decades of peace and relative prosperity. At a time when almost the rest of the Roman world was engulfed in conflict and conflagration, the Exarchate of Carthage remained an oasis of relative stability. Peace brought economic prosperity. Its grain was exported, along with goods produced by its artisans, especially their red pottery which was renowned throughout the Empire. With luminaries such as Pristian, Corippus, Victor of Tunis and Aldhelm, Africa also rose to become one of the intellectual centers of the world.  
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