Praying Tree

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Various Islamic websites have been touting an alleged miracle of a "praying" tree in Australia.

Miracle Claim[edit]

Tree Resembling Man in Prayer

This is a recently discovered phenomenon in a forest near Sydney. As you can see, the bottom half of the tree trunk is bowed in such a way that it resembles a person in a posture of Islamic prayer - the 'ruku'. Looking closer you can see the 'hands' resting on the knees.

Rukutree.jpg
P-tree1.jpg


The most amazing thing is that the 'man' is directly facing the Kaaba, Mecca, which is the direction Muslims all over the world face when in prayer.

Analysis[edit]

This tree has been artificially carved over time to give that impression (tree shaping or arborsculpture is actually a valid art form). Notice the following points:

  1. The “head” is carved out and looks as if it has been stuck/glued onto the trunk.
  2. The hands are strangely shaped at their junction with the trunk. At this junction, the hand looks to be made up of a few branches. Naturally, the solid trunk of a tree divides into branches and not vice versa. This “hand“ is not a natural outgrowth, but has been stuck to it manually.
  3. The lower half of the trunk in the background behind the bent trunk is obscured. Why? Is this due to the heap of branches and leaves supporting the “miracle” tree from toppling over? In the black and white photo, it is obvious that the man in white is holding the bent trunk. The man on the extreme right of the photo, besides holding that side of the banner, is seemingly helping to hold the trunk. In the coloured photo, there are these branches and leaves that are seemingly keeping the bent trunk from falling.
  4. Related to the previous point; if they will claim that this bent trunk is actually a part of the tree in the background and hence you can not see its lower part, then look carefully at the junction in-between the bent trunk and that tree. This junction is blurry and obscured, blotted by a large white area in the picture, Why would this be? Is this possibly the doctored part of the picture?
  5. There is no proof whatsoever provided in this photo that would suggest this bent trunk does indeed face Mecca.
  6. If it were a genuine miracle, why have the national independent newspapers in Australia not published this remarkable story?. Are those who discovered/doctored this image afraid of being exposed?

Conclusion[edit]

Trees do not have heads and arms to stand in prayer as these Muslims claim. Trees (like clouds) are limitless in variety and shape. Using a little imagination we could convince ourselves that another tree in that very image looks like a man with a very long neck (the head is out of frame) standing in front of the "praying" tree or maybe its walking towards the camera. Maybe the “miracle” tree is in fact a Christian tree bowing/praying to the tree in front of it which happens to be a wooden likeness of Jesus?

The fact that the miracle of the "Trees saying Shahadah" actually turned out to be a painting, leads us to believe that this too may simply be another hoax. Also, the pictures in the galleries below indicate that nature forms all types of random shapes. None of these are proof of the existence of Allah.

Other Tree Related Images[edit]

See Also[edit]

  • Hoaxes - A hub page that leads to other articles related to Hoaxes
  • Prayers - A hub page that leads to other articles related to Prayers

External Links[edit]