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According to Islamic scriptures, '''Jibreel''' (جبريل  Gabriel) is the angel who first appeared to [[Muhammad]] in the cave of Hijra and taught Muhammad the [[Qur'an]]. According to Islamic sources, Jibreel brought the revelations to all of the prophets from Adam to Muhammad. He is referred to as طاوؤس الملائكة "Peacock of the Angels" and, again according to Islamic sources, intervened at several points in the military career of the prophet such as at the [[Battle of Badr]] and [[The Massacre of the Banu Qurayza]]. He is mentioned by name in three places in the [[Qur'an]] and many times in the [[sira]] and [[hadith]] literature. In addition to being the bearer of revelations to the prophets and the warrior angel guiding and protecting Muhammad, he is also [[Jibreel (Gabriel) and al-Ruh al-Qudus (the Holy Spirit) in the Qur'an|associated with the Holy Spirit]] to such a degree that most Islamic commentators take him to be synonymous with the Holy Spirit, even though the term was only used in Christian and Jewish literature to refer to god himself.  
 
According to Islamic scriptures, '''Jibreel''' (جبريل  Gabriel) is the angel who first appeared to [[Muhammad]] in the cave of Hijra and taught Muhammad the [[Qur'an]]. According to Islamic sources, Jibreel brought the revelations to all of the prophets from Adam to Muhammad. He is referred to as طاوؤس الملائكة "Peacock of the Angels" and, again according to Islamic sources, intervened at several points in the military career of the prophet such as at the [[Battle of Badr]] and [[The Massacre of the Banu Qurayza]]. He is mentioned by name in three places in the [[Qur'an]] and many times in the [[sira]] and [[hadith]] literature. In addition to being the bearer of revelations to the prophets and the warrior angel guiding and protecting Muhammad, he is also [[Jibreel (Gabriel) and al-Ruh al-Qudus (the Holy Spirit) in the Qur'an|associated with the Holy Spirit]] to such a degree that most Islamic commentators take him to be synonymous with the Holy Spirit, even though the term was only used in Christian and Jewish literature to refer to god himself.  
  
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