Rule of Islamic law

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Rule of Shari'ah or rule of Islamic law is when the legal code of a political entity is based on Islamic law. There are debates as the extent of this implementation[1]; differing interpretations of sharia have existed since time immemorial.[2]

Warning[edit]

Rule of Islamic law permits summary executions for lack of Islamic virtue[3].

Sheikh Ayman Zawahiri has repeatedly called for the "rule of Shari'ah". In his September 2006 video release he called for "justice", "end to oppression", and "rule of Shari'ah".

Iran[edit]

In the Islamic Republic of Iran, many politicians[4] say "rule of law" when they mean rule of Shari'ah. Sometimes they say "Islamic law" while at other times they say "rule of law" for brevity; however, if asked they explain that all laws have to be in agreement with Shari'ah. Islamist democrats calls for rule of Islamic law, too.

Libya[edit]

In the Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, the Qur'an is constitution.

Nigeria[edit]

In the Federal Republic of Nigeria, there are 12 states with Shari'ah out of the 38 states.

Sudan[edit]

In Sudan, Shari'ah does not apply to Southern Sudan.

Saudi Arabia[edit]

The Basic Law of Saudi Arabia make it clear that no deviation from the Qur'an and Islamic jurisprudence is permissible. This is the objective of the Saudi Arabian kingdom.[5]

Somalia[edit]

The Union of Islamic Courts waged jihad to establish the rule of Islamic law in Somalia.[6] They were defeated[7] at the Battle of Jilib in the last week of 2006, by armed intervention led by Somali Prime Minister Ali Mohamed Gedi.

Criticism[edit]

Commentators believe that the hallmark of Islamic totalitarianism is rule of Islamic law.[8] The right to dissent and freedom from fear becomes virtually non-existent.[9]

See Also[edit]

Further Reading[edit]

External Links[edit]

References[edit]